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  #1  
Old 4th Jun 2009, 08:54 AM
gemsy gemsy is offline
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What qualifications do you need to be a qualified riding instructor?

Question in the title!
Thank you!
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  #2  
Old 4th Jun 2009, 08:56 AM
Fab filly Fab filly is offline
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good question.....id like to know that too....and also if you can do it part time/evenings?
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  #3  
Old 4th Jun 2009, 08:57 AM
Jackblack Jackblack is offline
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check out the BHS website, they have all the info there, takes a while to be fully qualified so make sure it is something you want to do
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  #4  
Old 4th Jun 2009, 09:13 AM
gemsy gemsy is offline
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do you have to do it through the BHS?
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  #5  
Old 4th Jun 2009, 09:15 AM
*Solo's Mum*'s Avatar
*Solo's Mum* *Solo's Mum* is offline
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there is no official qualifications NEEDED but alot of people prefer the BHS standards on the RI's
someone do correct me if i am wrong.
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  #6  
Old 4th Jun 2009, 09:21 AM
karsteine karsteine is offline
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You have to take you BHS stages, then move on to road safety course...i'm doing mine this year at Moulton College.
As for part time it depends on the college but i'm doing mine part time.
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  #7  
Old 4th Jun 2009, 09:30 AM
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Sunshine-x Sunshine-x is offline
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on the BHS you do stage 1 care + riding, then riding and road safety then stage 2 care + riding then your PTT then stage 3 care + riding, then BHSAI, then stage 4 care + riding, then BHSII. and you can go further but that is about the highest most people go to generally.
this page explains it pretty well. http://www.bhs.org.uk/content/Ods-Mo...rmation&area=2
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  #8  
Old 4th Jun 2009, 09:33 AM
jennywren07 jennywren07 is offline
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You can also do a course with the ABRS http://www.abrs-info.org/exams/qualifications.htm

A few people have said they've found the ABRS one to be a bit more "user friendly" than the BHS but i guess thats down to personal choice
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  #9  
Old 4th Jun 2009, 09:57 AM
Elly Koopman Elly Koopman is offline
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You can go through the BHS stages (1, 2 & 3) then take your PTT + teaching hours to get to AI. OR you can go through the ABRS, or do NVQ's. I'm not sure if it is the case now, but you used to be able to work through the pony club tests (D up to A) which you could then transfer to BHS so you only needed to take the PTT + hours.
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  #10  
Old 4th Jun 2009, 10:10 AM
Jessica23 Jessica23 is offline
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Im sure i did mine through my riding club... The BHS tests, but the Riding Club sorted it all out and sent a group of us to do it. It was a long time ago, but i cant remember doing it myself lol

I hated teaching with a passion and only did it for a couple of months... But good luck lol
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  #11  
Old 4th Jun 2009, 05:59 PM
rgbilyeu rgbilyeu is offline
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depends first off which organization you wish to be qualified through.

both the BHS and ABRS are the big ones. NVQ students go through on or the other if they want teaching under their belt as there is not a straight nvq programme that offers teaching.

BHS is more widely known, but the ABRS being that its soley riding school and training oreitated has more of a focus.

if you really want that piece of paper the abrs is cheaper, and more hands on then the bhs. but if you want to move about easier generally the bhs is where you want to head (you can always pull out your guidelines and show exactally what you have been taught if all else fails. )

also there is nothing wrong with having both sets under your belt

i am abrs biased. but have been trained both. i prefer the abrs system as its alot more hands on to me then the bhs system
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  #12  
Old 4th Jun 2009, 06:04 PM
Peaches Peaches is offline
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If you are interested in a more classical approach there is also the Heather Moffett EE training, but not sure how that stands in the whole run of things - and never had a lesson from one so can't say anything about that. Just thought I'd mention it as it is another option...x
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  #13  
Old 4th Jun 2009, 08:05 PM
gemsy gemsy is offline
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thank you everyone for replies. i am just thinking of a few different career options, not as a riding school instructor but as an independant instructor as i guess its possible to make a good living this way. or am i wrong??
how long does would it take to become qualified and cost? what does each modual involve? any info would be great.x
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  #14  
Old 5th Jun 2009, 10:50 PM
chris22 chris22 is offline
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I think you would find it difficult. You would really need to have your BHSAI and insurance to be freelance. The plus side of riding clubs and schools is that they can offer work all year round. Freelance instructors charge more but often have no work especially in the winter. A couple of our pony clubs and Riding clubs use freelance instructors but they have different ones every month so work can be intermittant, also to be really sucessful you need to have made your name in the equine world people like to have someone teach them who has acheived something themselves
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  #15  
Old 5th Jun 2009, 11:07 PM
acw295 acw295 is offline
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What do you mean by "good living"? Not being funny, it is just I couldn't live off it and have a horse. Most RI's I know teach as a sideline, they can't live off it and keep horses unless they have family help, an OH with more money or a second income stream.


Quote:
Originally Posted by gemsy View Post
thank you everyone for replies. i am just thinking of a few different career options, not as a riding school instructor but as an independant instructor as i guess its possible to make a good living this way. or am i wrong??
how long does would it take to become qualified and cost? what does each modual involve? any info would be great.x
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  #16  
Old 6th Jun 2009, 09:37 PM
trotter26 trotter26 is offline
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Too right! I gave it up full time when realised that most instructors working on yards full time past the age of 30 are broke and disillusioned! And the free lancers struggle to make ends meet as people think nothing of cancelling an hour before hand

I now have a full time 'proper' job and teach a few hours at a riding school and do the odd bit of freelance stuff
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  #17  
Old 7th Jun 2009, 03:18 PM
rgbilyeu rgbilyeu is offline
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if your serious about teaching get enough experience under you then apply for college positions as instructors and lecturers.
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