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  #1  
Old 17th Feb 2005, 11:42 PM
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Jog vs trot

Can any horse do the slow jog that horses trained in western riding do? How do you train a horse to do this? And actually, the same question goes for lope/canter.

Also, if horses are just free in the field and they are running around with their friends, are they moving in a "collected" way or not?

Thanks if anyone knows.
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Old 18th Feb 2005, 01:13 AM
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My TB is so lazy, he'll jog or lope unless ask for more.
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Old 18th Feb 2005, 01:23 AM
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laura jeanne - I'll ask Leslie, my trainer, who's put a really nice slow jog on Quanah for my future use (she refers to it as my "gear"). I would think you just ask for trot and "bump" (or "sponge") the reins until you get the jog you want, then give the horse praise and a loose rein. But I'll find out for sure how she did it and let you know.
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Old 18th Feb 2005, 03:36 AM
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A Western jog is a shortened trot gait with little or no suspension (air time) and with little bend in the knees and hocks. A lope is the canter equivalent (short strides, flat movement, and little suspension). Based on conformation and breeding, some horses naturally move in the short and low manner required for this gait (e.g., some QH's). Other horses naturally move long and low (e.g., many thoroughbreds), some naturally move with more rounded to medium gaits (e.g., Morgans and many Warmbloods), and some naturally move with extravagant knee action (e.g., saddlebreds, hackneys).

Any horse can be taught to shorten or flatten it's stride, but a horse that has flatter movement naturally, will have an easier time achieveing a true Western jog.

Conversely, a horse with more rounded movement and natural suspension, will have an easier time learning to move in a collected gait by dressage standards.
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Old 18th Feb 2005, 08:22 PM
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One reason I was asking is that in my last lesson, I worked with my school horse for just about 5-10 minutes doing trot/walk/back-up transitions while the instructor was busy with someone else and all of a sudden she was doing the daintiest trot ever which felt like she was just tip toeing along. NOT her usual style! I could just sit there and it felt like I was just bouncing on air - not even leaving the saddle.
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Old 18th Feb 2005, 10:01 PM
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Oh.
It appears my horse can jog.
I always thought of it as loping but I see now that is for canter.
How weird.
He has a very very bouncy trot (especially for a cob), but sometimes if you ask him to come down he does a very strange, ground covering trot. It's very very comfortable and he can keep it up for ages. It's exactly like you described - a trot with no suspension. I make him do it lots to save my poor aching seatbones and because I assumed it would work out different muscles on him. Ive never ridden another horse that can do it.
Interesting.
I have a western horse, apparently!

xxx
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Old 18th Feb 2005, 10:03 PM
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hehe cool jojoba
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  #8  
Old 19th Feb 2005, 12:07 AM
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jojoba - ask someone to take a look from the ground - he might be pacing? I rode a school horse a few weeks ago that could do it and its definately comfy and covers the ground easily - plus aids-wise my mount seemed to think it was one gear 'down' from full trot...Bob could also do a couple of others but my controls were a bit unreliable (soooo many choices! No idea what correct aids for them are! Plus no one warned me ) and I spent most of the hack asking the guy behind me what was happenning at any particular moment in time :-)

Or I guess you could just be grateful you have such a comfy horse Sounds fab I wish all horses had a comfy gait - especially my current school horse - he is soooo bouncy!

aj xx
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  #9  
Old 19th Feb 2005, 04:48 AM
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Quote:
sometimes if you ask him to come down he does a very strange, ground covering trot
If it covers a lot of ground, it's probably not a Western-style jog. A jog is low (with regard to knee and hock movement), but it's also a short, slow stride. You don't get anywhere fast with a jog, but it is easy to sit to.

Laura, it may be that your horse was jogging, but it may also be that she was rounding her back and moving in better balance. Your description of "bouncing on air" sounds more like the feel of a horse moving with more collection (in the dressage sense) than of a Western jog. In the former, the horse moves with suspension, but is rounded and relaxed, so the feeling is very comfortable and elastic. A Western jog feels very smooth and comfortable, but since there is no suspension, it feels level and flat, rather than bouncy or floaty.
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  #10  
Old 20th Feb 2005, 01:37 AM
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laura jeanne-
the last question you asked about your horse running around in the field is a very good question! I HIGHLY doubt that your horse is being collected, if it is, then you have a very nice dressage horse but for almost every horse it needs that extra push from a rider or handler on the ground to help it move from its back end with impulsion which is rlly what collecting is, the head just comes in after the butt!!
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Old 20th Feb 2005, 06:06 AM
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Hmm, I think collection is quite natural for horses moving freely, it's the proud, springy, rounded, neck-arched prance, of a horse showing off. I see mine do it all the time when he's feeling good. It's getting that same movement while carrying the weight of the rider that is difficult.
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Old 21st Feb 2005, 10:24 AM
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I have trained my Arab X TB to jog, a friend of mine always calls it his 'fancy walk' cause although hes moving his feet in a trot pattern hes moving slower than when he walks out I just troted him to start with then slowed the movement in my hips to make him match it, he used to break pace alot (just have to start over when they do this) but now he knows what I'm asking for hes got pretty good at it.

J
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