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  #21  
Old 11th Sep 2001, 07:36 AM
Bebe Bebe is offline
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On the topic of hanging off gates, I've been there done that. I used to exercise a rather scatty (actually she's completely neurotic) part arab mare. She has a thing about gates, she'll let you open them from her back but she tries to dive through the minute there's even an inch gap of opening. One time we were coming out of the paddock (just setting off) and I had to open the metal gate. As I swung it open she charged through and I got my stirrup leather caught on it. The mare charged forwards and I held onto the reins whilst still being hung on the gate. Thankfully stirrup leather came off the bar of the saddle and I landed on the concrete floor - flat on my back. Finally let go of reins after horse nearly dislocated my shoulder. She ran off them came back and stood over at me, sure she wondered why I was down there and not on her back. Luckily I wasn't hurt, had a body protector and helmet on.

So, be careful and drop your stirrups if you're at all worried about getting caught up. It's easier to get your leg out of the way.

I've also managed to ride into a tree on this horse!

Amanda
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  #22  
Old 11th Sep 2001, 08:03 AM
Robt Robt is offline
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Thank You

Thanx for the advice and also to katyptaty for the link to that thread. Lots to read and very interesting
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  #23  
Old 11th Sep 2001, 12:49 PM
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MadWoman MadWoman is offline
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If you think you might be in a situation where you have to remount from the ground, then put a hunting breastplate on the horse. By reaching over the withers and holding onto that with your left hand instead of the mane, it gives you loads more leverage. I couldn't get onto my 17hh from the ground without one!
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  #24  
Old 22nd Sep 2001, 01:44 PM
TD TD is offline
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Hi every1, i used to ride and compete a 18.2hh 5yr old gelding. i broke him in myself and luckily he was very well behaved and didnt attempt to get me off once otherwise it would have been a long way to fall!!!!

when ever we used to have to open gates it would take me ages because i couldnt reach them so i had to make him stand really close to it and then he would refuse to go near it or i would grab the gate nad then he would walk off or start stepping backwards nearly ripping my arm off, but i couldnt get off because theres never anything around to help me get back on!!!

but there was one good thing- he could just step over the jumps and wouldnt struggle over the big ones like the smaller ones did. he could jump anything with ease!

it would take me about 10mins just to get him in and out of his stable because he thought he would hit he's head so he used to take ages to get him self prepared etc.


Tina
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  #25  
Old 24th Sep 2001, 07:29 AM
London Rider London Rider is offline
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18.2hh ???? Is this a Showjumper Record for the Message Board ???

Blimey TD !!! !8.2hh ??? That's huge. How d'you get on him ??? I'd need to get that young Robt to make me an extra-high mounting block.

Seriously though, do you need long legs to ride an 18.2. I'm sure I would confuse a horse that big, as my legs and feet would be in the wrong place to give the corect aids - like barely below the saddle flaps !!!!

Must be a longer pre-ride prepartion time - that's a lot of muddy horse to groom when you get him in from the field, and quite a stretch for tacking up.

And you say you jumped him as well ? I know a lot of folk ride heavy / draft horses these days, but 18.2hh must be pretty near a record height for a showjumper. Wonder if anyone else here does showjumping or eventing on horses this size ?
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  #26  
Old 24th Sep 2001, 06:27 PM
TD TD is offline
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the only way i could get on him is by using the stone mountain blocks at the yard. they were very tall but the hardest part was trying to make him stand still or to stop him swinging his hind quarters out so i couldnt reach the stirrup.

the worst part was trying to find a horse box that he would fit in because if it didnt look big enough he would refuse to go in it!

Im 5ft9 so i suppose ive got fairly long legs but he was used to me riding him so he knew what i was asking of him and he seemed to go well for other riderd too

it would take me ages to groom him because he would make sure in winter he came in with as much mud on him as possible so it would take me ages to groom etc. i used to have to stand on a big block or bucket to groom he top of him. now and again before a show when he used to have to be groomed properly i used to hold him and a friend would sit on him to groom the top- it was gr8 fun!! and he enjoyed

alot of horses at the shows were usually between 15.3hh-17.2hh but there were always a few what were around 18hh who did pretty well.

this horse was shire x tb so he had the height and power of a shire and the speed of a tb!!

there is a big grey thats a international showjumpers who competes for a foreign country, i think he's about 17.2/3 and he's not fast againest the clock but is always clear!

I dont think i'll ever have a horse that size again because its too much hazzle all the grooming, special equipment etc. he was hard work to look after etc! but he was a good horse
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  #27  
Old 25th Sep 2001, 06:55 AM
London Rider London Rider is offline
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Thanks

Hi TD,

Thanks for the reply & info.

I did read about a shire (not a shire x) that had proved to be a good showjumper, (owners discovered this when he kept jumping out of the field) but in my ignorance thought this must be very rare. Thanks for putting me right on this.

Think I'll stay with riding "standard sized" horses though. Not so far to fall !!!
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  #28  
Old 25th Sep 2001, 01:03 PM
London Rider London Rider is offline
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Tighter Jodhpurs ? Unusual Idea, but,..............

I know we've had lots of comments here, and covered all solutions but this idea is just so radically unusual that I had to add it to the rest.

Just found message on another horse site from a 5ft 2 rider who couldn't mount her 16.3hh TB from ground. She could get her foot in the high stirrup by holding the stirrup in her left hand and pulling her foot up higher with the right hand . (She did warn that this could be dangerous if horse didn't stand still). But she couldn't pull herself up into the saddle.

Her previous horse was 15hh, she could get on that without a leg up / mounting block when necessary, and wanted to be equally independent with her new horse.

But it was easier when she bought new tighter fitting jodhpurs.

This sounds completely contradictory, surely they would restrict her movement.

But she said her old jods were well worn and baggy.

The new ones howeverwere made of a strong tight fitting but very stretchy fabric. Providing she could get her foot into the stirrup, the stretchy fabric gave her extra bounce as she hopped, just like "wearing a trampoline", and usually was just enough to launch herself off the ground up into the saddle.
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  #29  
Old 25th Sep 2001, 01:57 PM
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floppy floppy is offline
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hehe..jodhpurs giving on extra bounce to mount a horse!?

wel..jodphurs are suppose to fit closely to the skin...but there is fitting close to the skin that you by no means whatsoever can get them off.....let alone on...
and then there are the jodhpurs that are really baggy..which in most cases you tend to see small skinny young kids wear
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  #30  
Old 25th Sep 2001, 05:23 PM
TD TD is offline
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Hi again London Rider, my friend owns a cyldsdale (sp??) who keeps jumping out of her field, the post and rail is about 4ft.

so because the girl is scared of jumping she asked me to jump her and we managed to clear 3ft10 but she couldnt go any higher because she was too clumsey

i have also competed a 16hh heavyweight cob for a women. when i first started riding him he was very overweight, unfit and couldnt jump above 2ft. i worked really hard with him and managed to get him to jump 4ft8 which proved everyone at the hole yard he was stabled at wrong because they all thought he was a slow fat plodder but he managed to always be in the rosettes. no one thought he could jump!!

he also proved that he wasnt a plodder by bolting off with me plenty of times abnd tanking me round the manage when he was in one of his mood. he had lots of stength and knew just how to use it againest you to be able to do what he wants.

he was good fun and i enjoyed seeing him come on and prove himself!!

Tina
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  #31  
Old 26th Sep 2001, 12:40 PM
Lightfoot Lightfoot is offline
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Don't Get Down

Browsing through the archives I found a thread called Tall Horse Troubles. The first message is very amusing so I have copied it here. If you want to read the rest the thread start is 3 December 1999. Copy starts here;


In fact I had a problem the first time the owner said she thought I'd be OK to go out my own instead of just riding around the field. But this first problem was my own fault - all due to VANITY.

I rode it straight to my friend Carol's house, wanted to show off on MY (!!!) Big Horse. I got down, tied horse to front gate, walked up the path and knocked on her front door.

Big Mistake !!! Always make sure the person you're visiting is at home before dismounting. Her brother Paul answered and said Carol would be home in about an hour, so I said I'd continue my ride and call in on the way back.

I had planned to get back on from their garden wall by the gate. Viewed from the saddle it had looked OK, but when I positioned the horse alongside it now seemed much lower. I stood on it and tried to get my foot in the stirrup. This wall was way too low. I eventually got my foot in the stirrup, hopped and jumped for ages but couldn't pull myself up. So near and yet so far I either needed a push or a higher wall. So I set off down the lane in search of a suitable bank or wall.

There was nothing so I returned to Carol's wall and tried again. Paul then appeared. "You're back quick, " he said . "Carol's not home yet." Then he looked at the horse . "Oh wow . That is really one hell of a big horse . I'm surprised
you can even get on it ! "

I thought, it's no good trying to bluff this out, because he's bound to stay and wait until I ride away. I was already red from exertion, but went even redder as I said, "Well actually I can't.
Would you mind.........................."

"Should have said sooner. We've got the very thing for that." He went indoors and emerged carrying a small kitchen stepladder. With such a high mounting block I had no trouble getting into the saddle this time.

I discovered Paul was very tactful. When I returned an hour later he had taken the stepladder indoors and hadn't mentioned my difficulty to Carol. I let her have a quick ride up and down the lane (should have asked the owner first though) but did it because she would need a leg up to get on so would not tease me when I needed help

To test out my theory I used their wall again, and this time with Carol pushing me, I successfully (though not elegantly !) reached the lofty saddle.

You know that Paul is very nice. Perhaps I should ride over to Carol's again when she is out so I can get him to help me up ? No I'm NOT SERIOUS, only joking. I also ought to add (before Mike does) that these days it is definitely NOT a good idea for a rider (especially a lone female) to ask complete strangers to help her get on her horse !!!!!!

I also read some alarming statistics that the majority of horse riding accidents occur whilst the rider is mounting the horse.


Has anyone else had problems / embarrassing moments when getting on or off a horse.
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  #32  
Old 26th Sep 2001, 08:54 PM
ros ros is offline
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Ho yes! But chiefly because my most recent mounts have been so b---- fat that the saddle slips under their tummies. (I'm too soft to girth them up tight enough to get on.)

Once upon a time I used to be able to vault on, but that was about 20 years ago when I was 5'10'' and my mare was 14.3hh (I'm still 5'10'' but my horses are 16.3hh and 16.1hh and I'm not even going to bother trying - unless, of course, I can find a handsome young man to give me a push...)
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  #33  
Old 27th Sep 2001, 05:20 PM
TD TD is offline
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A handsome young man would work well for me too!!
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  #34  
Old 27th Sep 2001, 07:13 PM
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floppy floppy is offline
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work well for me too but i think i would have to change the hros ei ride to a bigger one...and then recosnider my dreams of owning an icelandic and buy a big 18hh horse!
I dont think any young handssome man would help me in mounting a 14.2hh haflinger with me being 5'7 and able to volt up into the saddle anyway
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  #35  
Old 2nd Oct 2001, 07:42 AM
Weekender Weekender is offline
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Embarassing

A new horse arrived at our riding school recently and were all puzzled his name, Buster. Seemed more appropriate for a fiesty pony or a chunky cob, rather than this elegant 17.2hh TB, but school reluctant to change name as its supposed to be unlucky.

But after last weekend, we believe it may have been an abbreviation for something like Jodzbuster.

An athletic young lady was endeavouring to mount unaided, managed to get her foot in the high stirrup, but on the third hop her jodhpurs split.
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  #36  
Old 2nd Oct 2001, 05:39 PM
TD TD is offline
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Ohhhh! How embarrasing!
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  #37  
Old 9th Oct 2001, 09:47 PM
¤KIWI¤ ¤KIWI¤ is offline
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You would get on him, just like you would a 14.3hh horse. I dont believe in using boxes unless absolutely necassary. If the horse is too big for you to get on without help, then maybe he isnt the best horse for you. You never know what kind of situation you might get in one day, where you will have to mount your horse from the ground. Practice leg stretching, and maybe lower your stirrup at first, but you **should** beable to get on your horse from the ground, if not, then maybe you should get a shorter horse!
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  #38  
Old 9th Oct 2001, 09:56 PM
Moonlightrider Moonlightrider is offline
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I'm starting to use a mountin block quite a lot. I never used to, but I'm riding a four-year-old right now, and he won't stand still very well. My instructor won't hold him (it's one of those things you have to learn on your own... *sighs* it would be so much easier) so I can hop on much faster with help. Of course, it takes a few tries to get the block near him...

Also, he had slightly off withers. It doesn't hurt him, but we have to use high-withered saddles and those slip pretty easily...
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  #39  
Old 10th Oct 2001, 01:35 AM
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Katie_85 Katie_85 is offline
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I disagree Kiwi. Using a mounting block saves much on the saddle, not to mention the poor creature's back! There is much sideways pull when a rider mounts un-aided. If we can make life easier on the horse (and on ourselves) then why not?
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  #40  
Old 10th Oct 2001, 07:04 AM
TD TD is offline
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I agree with Katie_85. using a mountain block does prevent injury on the horses back. i know alot of riders which just scramble up from the ground and many of their horses have had to have their backs put back in!

I dont think its very nice for the horse pulling on its back like that, its much easier & kinder to just slip your leg over or put your foot in the stirrup when your up a bit higher if you have to get on a big horse.
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