Arthritis mamagement.

lauren123

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Feb 3, 2007
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So the giraffe has i believe high ring bone in his hinds and low ring bone in his fores.
In his hinds you can see the 2 extra bone bits very easily. He doesnt really appear in pain with them. Atleast not his fores though can be unsure to pick up his hind feet .. or will but will lift them really high at first.
Since he has been sound i have brought him back into work and he enjoys his hacking and a good gallop!!
Ideally in 2019 i am wanting to do some vert low level dressage and showing. But i am worried about making his problems worse. I know a one.of schooling wouldnt hurt but if i was to pratise for a test shall we say it might.
I have thought of possibly ways to manage him. I know of magnetic products on the market which claim to help. Which i am unsure about.
Ofcourse there is the supplements. Having spoke to my vet before they said they do do one... at £50!
At present sox goes out in the morning. Comes in for his lunch and then i work him in the afternoon mainly hack him though have needed to lunge beforehand (I have stopped this Though!)
I do try to inhand walk him after i have worked him too.
Any thoughts
I was going to say more time in the field but considering sox spent 1.5 hours just cribbing in the field!!! YO thought it would be better if he was in eating hay.
 

Bodshi

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Apr 23, 2009
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It is a tricky one isn't it? When Raf was first diagnosed with 'arthritic changes' the vet told me to carry on as normal with hacking, endurance, hunting etc but to avoid repetitive circles in the school. I've also discussed it with my physio, who says that it will benefit Raf to continue with our flatwork lessons because he needs to build the correct muscle to support his joints. Realistically I have one lesson a week and very occasionally go in the school to practice in between times, so it's not as if I'm hammering him in there every day. I like the sound of your YO too - I know it would be ideal if Sox could spend his days wandering about the field but if he's just going to stand cribbing it's pointless - my vet said the same about Raf spending his time standing in the mud at the hay feeder.

I'd already tried msn glucosamine (before he was diagnosed, just because I'd read it was good for joints), then started using a supplement from my vet and later moved onto Riaflex, because someone on here had almost miraculous results from it, but I can't say I noticed any difference with any of them and I couldn't shake the feeling that I might be getting conned out of parting with loads of money for something that looked good in theory but actually wasn't making the slightest bit of difference (I think this about a lot of horse supplements!)

Glad Sox is enjoying life again :) I'm curious about the in hand walks after you've worked him. Why do you do that?
 
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Kite_Rider

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I'm a bit like Bodshi where supplements are concerned, our vet told me that clinically the only proven supplement that is actually utilised by the horse is glucosamine, funny that they sell just such a thing at a tidy price too. She said nothing else has been proven scientifically to actually be absorbed by the horses body.
Any how, Belle has arthritis, I don't school her at all in a school, we still practise a bit of lateral work out on a hack occasionally and she's out as long as I can keep her out, however, if Sox is just standing around cribbing and he's not happy out he most likely is better being in munching hay, as for schooling him and doing dressage tests I guess having a word with your vet would be the best advice I could give you, they are most likely to know how it will affect him if at all.
 

lauren123

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Glad Sox is enjoying life again :) I'm curious about the in hand walks after you've worked him. Why do you do that?
Enjoying life is a understatement i often have a bucking,bouncy off all 4 giraffe!
Its more lile if i ride at way 2 and still there at 4 lol
I'm a bit like Bodshi where supplements are concerned, our vet told me that clinically the only proven supplement that is actually utilised by the horse is glucosamine, funny that they sell just such a thing at a tidy price too. She said nothing else has been proven scientifically to actually be absorbed by the horses body.
Any how, Belle has arthritis, I don't school her at all in a school, we still practise a bit of lateral work out on a hack occasionally and she's out as long as I can keep her out, however, if Sox is just standing around cribbing and he's not happy out he most likely is better being in munching hay, as for schooling him and doing dressage tests I guess having a word with your vet would be the best advice I could give you, they are most likely to know how it will affect him if at all.
Yeah he is fue his health check soon. (Since se no longer see the vet on a weekly/monthly basis! *touch wood*)
 

Kite_Rider

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Yeah he is fue his health check soon. (Since se no longer see the vet on a weekly/monthly basis! *touch wood*)
Fingers crossed for his continued good health, could you just phone the vet and ask, to put your mind at rest, instead of waiting for his health check?
 
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Trewsers

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I think I might have mentioned Nutraquin plus before @lauren123 ? It really has worked for Storm. She is retired of course now but it keeps her much much less stiff on her hocks. Most vets will tell you to turn out as much as possible to keep them moving, however if Sox just stands cribbing, it is a bit pointless! It's a case of finding a balance with movement and their comfort. Some just don't like being left out - even if it is for their own good!
 
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Jane&Ziggy

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Mattie (also an ex racehorse, though he's an Arab) cribs in the field if there isn't lots to eat. He's worse in the stable, but if Sox likes to be in munching that's what I would let him do, unless you can put a round bale or something in his field.

No words of wisdom on his advice, but do you really gallop him? With those legs? Gosh you're brave!
 
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carthorse

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I would say lunging & galloping are likely to do far more damage than the schooling needed for low level dressage & local showing!

You say you believe he has high ringbone in his hinds & low ringbone in his fores, but have you had the vet confirm this with x-rays? There are also different types of ringbone with one much more likely to cause problems than the other. I can't see lifting his hinds very high first is likely to be connected to ringbone, possibly a hock or stifle problem but not ringbone.

I would say if you have a good school surface then introduce some correct schooling very gradually, start with just 5 minutes at the end of a hack. Concentrate on getting him working from behind and lifting his back so he's stretching and moving freely, do not force an outline or short frame. If he feels like he struggles or is unhappy you have your answer, or it may be that careful school work on a good surface is actually easier for him than the concussion from roadwork & strains of working on uneven ground.
 

Trewsers

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I would say lunging & galloping are likely to do far more damage than the schooling needed for low level dressage & local showing!

You say you believe he has high ringbone in his hinds & low ringbone in his fores, but have you had the vet confirm this with x-rays? There are also different types of ringbone with one much more likely to cause problems than the other. I can't see lifting his hinds very high first is likely to be connected to ringbone, possibly a hock or stifle problem but not ringbone.

I would say if you have a good school surface then introduce some correct schooling very gradually, start with just 5 minutes at the end of a hack. Concentrate on getting him working from behind and lifting his back so he's stretching and moving freely, do not force an outline or short frame. If he feels like he struggles or is unhappy you have your answer, or it may be that careful school work on a good surface is actually easier for him than the concussion from roadwork & strains of working on uneven ground.

Yes I I would second that about a good school surface causing less bother than uneven ground and roadwork concussion.
 
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lauren123

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Mattie (also an ex racehorse, though he's an Arab) cribs in the field if there isn't lots to eat. He's worse in the stable, but if Sox likes to be in munching that's what I would let him do, unless you can put a round bale or something in his field.

No words of wisdom on his advice, but do you really gallop him? With those legs? Gosh you're brave!
Well when i Say galloping. Sox would LOVE it but i have never had enough space to let him go!
 

lauren123

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Feb 3, 2007
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I would say lunging & galloping are likely to do far more damage than the schooling needed for low level dressage & local showing!

You say you believe he has high ringbone in his hinds & low ringbone in his fores, but have you had the vet confirm this with x-rays? There are also different types of ringbone with one much more likely to cause problems than the other.
The ring bone in his fores was picked up on xray. Its his coffin joint.
The hinds havent been xrayed but i had a very experienced vet tell me. 'Im almost certain he has it' that was just by looking at him.
 

carthorse

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Lauren why can't you ever give s straightforward information so we can give you straightforward, useful replies? First you say you believe he has high ringbone behind & low in front, which I at least read as you think he may have but haven't had a diagnosis. Then you say in a later post that the fronts have been confirmed & a vet thinks he has behind. You also say in the original post he enjoys a good gallop out hacking, only to backtrack in a later post and say he'd love to but you've never let him go! I can't be the only one who finds inconsistencies like this exasperating.

Part of me thinks if he has diagnosed ringbone, diagnosed navicular, a history of PPID laminitis, leg problems & ulcers that you shouldn't set your targets too high for him as even light hacking is a bonus. Take each day as it comes & keep a very close eye on his comfort.