Have we bred a whole generation of whinging wimps?

Pete's Mum

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Jun 4, 2014
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@ Trewsers Sorry to hear about your husband. It's scary isn't it.

My OH has Cystic Fibrosis and wasn't expected to make eighteen months when born. He's still kicking about at 36 years old ;) Although he has very low lung fuction and other complications (he can't digest food without tablets and his blood can clot for fun for example). He's baffled the medical profession for years, as he's so 'well' for someone with his condition in it's severity - he plays 5 aside football (admittedly with a team who essentially are his friends and don't care he can't run properly), cycles a bit and goes to the gym. When he was young he played national youth football and youth cricket for his county. He's forever arguing with the top consultants and surgeon in the country about how he doesn't need a lung transplant yet ... even they admit he's a freak of medicine.

If you were to see him on the pub on a Friday night, you'd be none the wiser (don't get me started on the abuse we've had on having a disabled car badge ...!) but he obviously does a lot of treatment, has good and not so good days and if we're unlucky he can be hospitalised for anything from a few weeks to months if he picks anything up!

I mean, his lungs literally grow their own bacteria and mould. We don't need any other bugs so are very careful - like I said, there's often more than people see initially.
 

eventerbabe

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Dec 16, 2004
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I agree in general. Being a teacher I put up with "generation snowflake" on a daily basis. And being a science teacher, oh my goodness, the challenges that poses to snowflakes is mind boggling! "It smells", "I don't want to touch that, it might blow up" of an unlit Bunsen burner. There is an argument that "lawnmower" parents creat children lacking in resilience and problem solving abilities. They mow down the issues so their children don't have to experience challenge or failure. Maybe not a hugely bad thing but people need a degree of resilience and common sense.

Since losing my little boy, I have become more acutely aware of hidden illnesses. I look fine. But I only gave birth 12 weeks ago. My body is still healing and my mind is a massive work in progress. I get funny looks from strangers who ask why I'm not at work. No baby so why get maternity leave? If only they understood. I would be on a one way track to mental breakdown if I had gone back to work straight after. On the other hand, because I'm being proactive (counselling, complimentary therapies and yoga) some folk think I'm medicated as I'm not as visibly distraught as they feel I should be. But they can't see the huge battle raging inside.
 

Huggy

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Nov 11, 2018
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I agree in general. Being a teacher I put up with "generation snowflake" on a daily basis. And being a science teacher, oh my goodness, the challenges that poses to snowflakes is mind boggling! "It smells", "I don't want to touch that, it might blow up" of an unlit Bunsen burner. There is an argument that "lawnmower" parents creat children lacking in resilience and problem solving abilities. They mow down the issues so their children don't have to experience challenge or failure. Maybe not a hugely bad thing but people need a degree of resilience and common sense.

Since losing my little boy, I have become more acutely aware of hidden illnesses. I look fine. But I only gave birth 12 weeks ago. My body is still healing and my mind is a massive work in progress. I get funny looks from strangers who ask why I'm not at work. No baby so why get maternity leave? If only they understood. I would be on a one way track to mental breakdown if I had gone back to work straight after. On the other hand, because I'm being proactive (counselling, complimentary therapies and yoga) some folk think I'm medicated as I'm not as visibly distraught as they feel I should be. But they can't see the huge battle raging inside.
Quite right - your nearest and dearest know what you've been through, and only they matter. You're doing what you need to do. You're dealing with a lot.
 

Skib

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Dec 21, 2003
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You may have done. Judging by my grandchildren I have not.

CS isnt easy, so sympathies. But to cheer you up the sufferer in our extended family is now 43. Medicine now isnt what it was when they were born and given the prognosis.
 

Frances144

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You might have. Mine are utter troopers. Nothing is too much for them. Out ragworting all hours, clean, cook, help, offer to help, look for things to do that will help me, do stuff without me even asking or thinking about it. I can't fault mine and would hate to think anyone thought they were snowflakes.

I won't comment on others.
 
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Ale

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Feb 8, 2012
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I'm not a softy by any means, I broke a rib recently and only told one person until now. But I also can't stand people who drag themselves into work when they are sick. If you are unwell with something contagious you are not a hero going into work (unless your job is critical) this may divide opinion...
 

Trewsers

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I'm not a softy by any means, I broke a rib recently and only told one person until now. But I also can't stand people who drag themselves into work when they are sick. If you are unwell with something contagious you are not a hero going into work (unless your job is critical) this may divide opinion...
I agree with that, if it's something other folk can catch - no thanks - stay home!
 
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newforest

You learn as much from failure, as you do success
Mar 15, 2008
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I agree with the passing on of bugs. I managed to catch a flu type bug off someone that took me three weeks to shift.
I can limit spreading it myself, but someone still has to check the horse!
Slightly ot, but does anyone else get people ask if they need to check the horse everyday? Um, if you had a child you would feed and check on them or would you leave in the house?
 
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Huggy

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I agree with the passing on of bugs. I managed to catch a flu type bug off someone that took me three weeks to shift.
I can limit spreading it myself, but someone still has to check the horse!
Slightly ot, but does anyone else get people ask if they need to check the horse everyday? Um, if you had a child you would feed and check on them or would you leave in the house?
All the time lol. Then watch incredulous looks from non horsey people. :D
 
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Huggy

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I think everyone can ignore my post about soldiering on with broken toes etc. Leading Hogan out to the field today he yanked on the lead rope to eat at the side of the track and ditched me into the nettles and brambles. I'm nettled on my arms, bottom, thighs and neck. IT HURTS!!!!!! Also note to self - leggings DO NOT protect your skin from stings.
 

newforest

You learn as much from failure, as you do success
Mar 15, 2008
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Does anyone else watch the 999 what's your emergency. Just the volume of ridiculous callers such as a "stubbed toe and it hurts" suggests that some people don't know what an emergency actually is.

Watching The Force now and the female pc (I would bring back the W) said that police number is probably on people's default list of favourite numbers to call and sort every little thing out.
 

Trewsers

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I think everyone can ignore my post about soldiering on with broken toes etc. Leading Hogan out to the field today he yanked on the lead rope to eat at the side of the track and ditched me into the nettles and brambles. I'm nettled on my arms, bottom, thighs and neck. IT HURTS!!!!!! Also note to self - leggings DO NOT protect your skin from stings.
Ouchy!!! They sting through jeans too!
 
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Kite_Rider

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May 18, 2009
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I think everyone can ignore my post about soldiering on with broken toes etc. Leading Hogan out to the field today he yanked on the lead rope to eat at the side of the track and ditched me into the nettles and brambles. I'm nettled on my arms, bottom, thighs and neck. IT HURTS!!!!!! Also note to self - leggings DO NOT protect your skin from stings.
I'm wierd, I actually like the feel of nettle stings :eek: although probably not all over me.
 

newforest

You learn as much from failure, as you do success
Mar 15, 2008
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I think everyone can ignore my post about soldiering on with broken toes etc. Leading Hogan out to the field today he yanked on the lead rope to eat at the side of the track and ditched me into the nettles and brambles. I'm nettled on my arms, bottom, thighs and neck. IT HURTS!!!!!! Also note to self - leggings DO NOT protect your skin from stings.
Neither do riding tights I suspect.
 
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Bodshi

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Does anyone else watch the 999 what's your emergency. Just the volume of ridiculous callers such as a "stubbed toe and it hurts" suggests that some people don't know what an emergency actually is.
I saw something on TV recently where they were replaying some of the ridiculous calls (can't remember what program it was now). One of them was from someone who had a spider in her house and 'needed' the police to come and remove it for her because she didn't know what to do.

I'm wierd, I actually like the feel of nettle stings :eek: although probably not all over me.
I quite like it too, although recently I had a really weird reaction like a day after where the area I'd got stung came up in a kind of rash, but like little blood blisters that didn't disappear when you pressed them, with an actual blister in the middle and this really strange sensation on the skin, so if I touched it ever so slightly it tingled like an electric shock. I've never had that before, don't know if it was a particularly venomous nettle or what! BTW I didn't make a fuss about it lol.
 

fourlegs

Horse addict
I am an obstinate so and so - heart attack? broken pelvis? - I just get on with it... was laid out flat last christmas with a bout of bronchial pneumonia, that slowed me up a bit! Rarely go to A&E and only then when my daughter in law insists - she is the staff senior nurse in the local A&E so I tend to believe her when she says go!