Hello everyone, am i too heavy for my horse?

Properties from Landhousefarm.com

Rosie31

New Member
Dec 28, 2019
3
1
3
32
I'm new here and I wondered, could anyone tell me if they think at 11 and a half stone and 5ft 4inch would I be too heavy/tall for a 14.1 hh lightweight sec d she is 11 and reasonably fit. I have no wish to compete or jump, just happy hacking, some cantering thrown in. Honest opinions please, wont ride yet until I have lost weight if I'm too heavy. I am balanced and very light handed if that helps, thank you x
 
Last edited:

newforest

Somewhere in the solar system
Mar 15, 2008
27,453
12,809
113
I hate these type of threads because it can be how long is a piece of string.
Whether you ride light or heavy, fitness of both of you, the bone etc.

This tells you what your ideal weight is for your height. Then you need to include the weight of the saddle and your riding clothes. It can be interesting to put all our winter clothes on and stand on the scales with the saddle plus pad, girth.
 

carthorse

Super Moderator
Staff member
Jan 6, 2006
7,919
3,766
113
As @newforest says this is an impossible question to answer because there are far too many variables. I'm heavier than you and I also have a 14.2 if he stands up Section D who is at the lighter end of the breed - more than once people who should know better have mistaken him for D x Arab and one elderly lady a few years back was adamant he was an old fashioned Crabbet Arab to the extent that she thought I'd got the wrong papers! Mine carries me just fine for what we do and will happily out walk and trot much bigger horses, but just because mine copes doesn't mean a thing in relation to yours and I've seen him struggle with much lighter but less balanced riders. So potentially she's fine, but the only way to know is to try things and see.

I'm also bordering on obsessive about things like feet being well shod regularly, tack fitting properly and back checks.
 

Skib

Well-Known Member
Dec 21, 2003
7,830
1,437
113
London
People often say that it depends on how well balanced a rider is. I think this is questionable.
I am not balanced and was riding two horses that could carry only 10 stone. My weight in winter clothes was a bit over 10 after an operation but I was told it was fine for me to go on riding my old share. Carthorse has a horse that wont go for an unbalanced rider but it has never been a worry for any horse I have ridden. Either RS or privately owned. And RDA riders ride happily with a missing limb.
If one loses a stone one can feel that any horse goes more easilly - so it is up to one's conscience and good sense. Race horses are made to carry extra weight according to handicap, so surely more weight on a rider slows a horse down.
On a larger forum than this or on line OP you will find data on the weight carrying ability of horses - It is to do with build rather than height.

Regardless of riding, I believe in controlling one's weight. I come from an obese maternal family. Thos of us who are not overweight keep a firm eye on the scales.
 

Trewsers

Well-Known Member
Oct 13, 2004
52,646
13,123
113
50
On an island
Hello and welcome:) I have no idea really, I rode a Connie x for years but according to most weight / horse standards I was veering toward too heavy on her but I didn’t feel that was true. But it’s hard to judge without knowing horse and rider, there are so many variables. Could you ask your riding instructor if you have one?
 

Rosie31

New Member
Dec 28, 2019
3
1
3
32
Hello and welcome:) I have no idea really, I rode a Connie x for years but according to most weight / horse standards I was veering toward too heavy on her but I didn’t feel that was true. But it’s hard to judge without knowing horse and rider, there are so many variables. Could you ask your riding instructor if you have one?
Hello thank you for the welcome. I am just getting back into riding after a few years away from it and will be taking lessons soon whilst shes in training so il ask them then, however as I'm a worrier il focus on losing a stone before she arrives I think. Il be using her barefoot treeless saddle, never used one before are they quite light? Thanks and thank you to everyone else for replying too x
 
  • Like
Reactions: Trewsers

Trewsers

Well-Known Member
Oct 13, 2004
52,646
13,123
113
50
On an island
Hello thank you for the welcome. I am just getting back into riding after a few years away from it and will be taking lessons soon whilst shes in training so il ask them then, however as I'm a worrier il focus on losing a stone before she arrives I think. Il be using her barefoot treeless saddle, never used one before are they quite light? Thanks and thank you to everyone else for replying too x
@newforest is knowledgeable on treeless, hopefully she'll see this.
 

newforest

Somewhere in the solar system
Mar 15, 2008
27,453
12,809
113
We need a lot more info before I can discuss saddles realistically.
At the weight you are op you will need the size two Barefoot and the pad designed for riders over eleven stone.

Barefoot
 

Toz

Active Member
Jul 14, 2019
327
198
43
41
Hi Op! Welcome! I have a mental block imagining or even guessing peoples weight. Your very slightly taller than me and I weigh (pre Christmas!) 9.5 I don’t honestly think I’d be comfortable on a 14.1 at a a whole lot more. (However I’m not used to riding anything smaller so that may also change if I sat on one!!) As I say though I have no real idea about weight and one 14.1 is very different to another, yours being young and fit is an obvious advantage .
 

Huggy

Well-Known Member
Nov 11, 2018
2,250
2,559
113
64
Welcome! Sorry, another "haven't a clue here"! But I'm 5'2, 8 and a half to 9 stone, on a 13hh cob - he's built like a brick outhouse, and could probably carry two of me. My general rule of thumb is, if he's happy, I'm happy. If you're just pootling out hacking, I would have thought you're ok, if you don't feel right at your weight as it is, do what you think you need to, to be happy with the ratio.
 

carthorse

Super Moderator
Staff member
Jan 6, 2006
7,919
3,766
113
People often say that it depends on how well balanced a rider is. I think this is questionable.
I am not balanced and was riding two horses that could carry only 10 stone. My weight in winter clothes was a bit over 10 after an operation but I was told it was fine for me to go on riding my old share. Carthorse has a horse that wont go for an unbalanced rider but it has never been a worry for any horse I have ridden. Either RS or privately owned. And RDA riders ride happily with a missing limb.
If one loses a stone one can feel that any horse goes more easilly - so it is up to one's conscience and good sense. Race horses are made to carry extra weight according to handicap, so surely more weight on a rider slows a horse down.
On a larger forum than this or on line OP you will find data on the weight carrying ability of horses - It is to do with build rather than height.

Regardless of riding, I believe in controlling one's weight. I come from an obese maternal family. Thos of us who are not overweight keep a firm eye on the scales.
@Skib it isn't that he won't go, rather he very quickly starts to look unsound and becomes clearly unhappy. He has never had the need to get used to unbalanced riders, given his sensitivity I would never ask it of him - if the odd friend wants to borrow him they either ride to his standard or get off. You mention RDA riders, but many years ago I did some work with an RDA group and it's amazing how well balanced some of them are in the saddle as well as the sensitivity they show the horses - they don't make excuses, they get on with it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ruskii

newforest

Somewhere in the solar system
Mar 15, 2008
27,453
12,809
113
Actually when I lost weight and jumped on mine bareback she was not amused!
It was a case of have some decency to have something padded. Hence my use of the bareback pad. Some horses are naturally sensitive and if you are not comfortable for them, then why should they continue to give permission for you to get on.

@carthorse
As for balance, then I hold my hand up and say ok, I can get left behind or in front of her movement. The same as she can get unbalanced herself.
In our case she's reluctant to go forward. Losing a stirrup in canter used to be met with her transitioning back to trot until you got it again.

I gave one of my treeless saddles to the RDA as they use that particular type and I couldn't get on with it at all.
 
  • Like
Reactions: carthorse and Huggy

carthorse

Super Moderator
Staff member
Jan 6, 2006
7,919
3,766
113
@newforest I think we all get unbalanced at times, even if it's only when they do something unpredictable or downright daft. That's very different from people who spend most of the time they are on a horse sat in an unbalanced way with no core strength and taking no responsibility for their posture or balance - I object to calling people like that riders, they're just a burden to the horse. I appreciate we've all gone through it as beginners, but there's no excuse for people who've been riding for years. Regardless of level or discipline riders owe it to the horse to ride as well as they can, that's why I won't subject my cob to lazy unbalanced riders.

I've ridden mine bareback a few times and despite looking like he should be comfortable he really isn't, and being narrower through the shoulder than his bum or ribcage gives a most unsafe feeling :eek: :eek::D
 

newforest

Somewhere in the solar system
Mar 15, 2008
27,453
12,809
113
@newforest I think we all get unbalanced at times, even if it's only when they do something unpredictable or downright daft. That's very different from people who spend most of the time they are on a horse sat in an unbalanced way with no core strength and taking no responsibility for their posture or balance - I object to calling people like that riders, they're just a burden to the horse. I appreciate we've all gone through it as beginners, but there's no excuse for people who've been riding for years. Regardless of level or discipline riders owe it to the horse to ride as well as they can, that's why I won't subject my cob to lazy unbalanced riders.

I've ridden mine bareback a few times and despite looking like he should be comfortable he really isn't, and being narrower through the shoulder than his bum or ribcage gives a most unsafe feeling :eek: :eek::D
Mine is wide, however she's got a narrow front chest- unless it's the "overhang" giving me that impression.
She is comfortable, but if you are not to her she objects and rightly so.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Huggy and carthorse

Skib

Well-Known Member
Dec 21, 2003
7,830
1,437
113
London
That's very different from people who spend most of the time they are on a horse sat in an unbalanced way with no core strength and taking no responsibility for their posture or balance - I object to calling people like that riders, they're just a burden to the horse. I appreciate we've all gone through it as beginners, but there's no excuse for people who've been riding for years. Regardless of level or discipline riders owe it to the horse to ride as well as they can, that's why I won't subject my cob to lazy unbalanced riders.
She means me of course. Ha ha as Ale would say.

I think it very unfortunate that carthorse's authoritative position on so many issues has deterred some knowledgeable previous NR members from using this Forum and may deter less able people and older people from starting to ride.

One trainer who described to me in detail her competition horse's ability to adjust was a show jumper Kathleen who suffered a stroke disabling her left side.
A combination of the horse adjusting and an unbalanced person making adjustments enable many of us to go on riding.

Indeed I would forecast that by the time carthorse is 80 years old even she wil need to adjust. Very few people reach 75 without damage through wear and tear (degeneration) to their lower spine or hips.

We adjust the left to right imbalance largely by using our head position as counter balance. A human head and the horse head weigh a significant amount. That is why a crooked person like me can still ride and trot bareback.
But we cannot make ourselves not crooked. We cannot adjust or equalise the angle at which a damaged hip may open -
If our left leg doesnt work it becomes lighter than the right leg (due to muscle wastage) we can use a stick (as in side saddle).

I ride largrely through feel. Something I learned on the lunge week after week. Even my new share has already (mysteriously) learned that if I relax my fingers and open my thighs, it is a signal we shall trot. Recently she cantered just on my saying the word.

I cannot claim that I never use leg to ride. We need to twist in and out of trees with overhanging branches and the four legs of the horse at that point may not be on a straight line, we need to ride the whole length of the horse. A French male RI told me never to duck (except on a very narrow track) but always to steer the horse - this makes for safer hacking as the horse is listening to the rider and you are in meticulous control of the placing of the feet, something learned in endless hours of pole work in walk.

What I am saying is that thanks to NR I learned to ride - and I am still riding 15 years later and still delighted. It would be nice if during the next year some one else past retirement age came to NR and was encouraged to ride without being told that the condition of their spine or hips rules it out.

An old person may need to find the shape and height of horse that suits their own body shape. For instance I know I could never ride Mary P's Ben. But no person on NR who ever invited me to visit or ride their horse ever complained. Two RIs actually had me ride their own personnal horses and I shared one of them.

Carthorse may not like a sack of potatos rider like me but on Horse and Hound forum we are in good company, and much loved by the horses we ride.
 

carthorse

Super Moderator
Staff member
Jan 6, 2006
7,919
3,766
113
She means me of course. Ha ha as Ale would say.

I think it very unfortunate that carthorse's authoritative position on so many issues has deterred some knowledgeable previous NR members from using this Forum and may deter less able people and older people from starting to ride.

One trainer who described to me in detail her competition horse's ability to adjust was a show jumper Kathleen who suffered a stroke disabling her left side.
A combination of the horse adjusting and an unbalanced person making adjustments enable many of us to go on riding.

Indeed I would forecast that by the time carthorse is 80 years old even she wil need to adjust. Very few people reach 75 without damage through wear and tear (degeneration) to their lower spine or hips.

We adjust the left to right imbalance largely by using our head position as counter balance. A human head and the horse head weigh a significant amount. That is why a crooked person like me can still ride and trot bareback.
But we cannot make ourselves not crooked. We cannot adjust or equalise the angle at which a damaged hip may open -
If our left leg doesnt work it becomes lighter than the right leg (due to muscle wastage) we can use a stick (as in side saddle).

I ride largrely through feel. Something I learned on the lunge week after week. Even my new share has already (mysteriously) learned that if I relax my fingers and open my thighs, it is a signal we shall trot. Recently she cantered just on my saying the word.

I cannot claim that I never use leg to ride. We need to twist in and out of trees with overhanging branches and the four legs of the horse at that point may not be on a straight line, we need to ride the whole length of the horse. A French male RI told me never to duck (except on a very narrow track) but always to steer the horse - this makes for safer hacking as the horse is listening to the rider and you are in meticulous control of the placing of the feet, something learned in endless hours of pole work in walk.

What I am saying is that thanks to NR I learned to ride - and I am still riding 15 years later and still delighted. It would be nice if during the next year some one else past retirement age came to NR and was encouraged to ride without being told that the condition of their spine or hips rules it out.

An old person may need to find the shape and height of horse that suits their own body shape. For instance I know I could never ride Mary P's Ben. But no person on NR who ever invited me to visit or ride their horse ever complained. Two RIs actually had me ride their own personnal horses and I shared one of them.

Carthorse may not like a sack of potatos rider like me but on Horse and Hound forum we are in good company, and much loved by the horses we ride.
Given that I've never seen you ride it seems slightly paranoid to think I'm talking about you Skib.

Posture and core strength isn't just an age thing, if only it were. I know teenagers with dreadful posture and tone, they flop around all over the place then blame the horse for not doing something they're making nighh on impossible. I know an 80yo lady I'd happily lend my lad to, likewise her friend who is well into her 70s - neither of them are a burden to their horses and while their positing may not be text book it's balanced and solid enough to allow a horse to comfortably do it's job.

As for damage and wear and tear, I bet there's a lot of us who wished that only happened when ẃe reached our 70s lol

Forums rare, inmy opinion, for sharing opinions and discussions. If you feel the need to take things personally then maybe you should consider why. If I want to target a remark at someone I'll do so by name, if I don't use a name then it's a general comment, if you can't deal win that then it's your problem.
 

Cortrasna

Grumpy old nag
Aug 5, 2009
10,139
3,513
113
Ireland
I think it very unfortunate that carthorse's authoritative position on so many issues has deterred some knowledgeable previous NR members from using this Forum and may deter less able people and older people from starting to ride
Skib i cannot believe you have actually said that about an extremely knowledgeable and helpful member of this forum - where on earth you get the mad notion that anything Carthorse may or may not have put on this forum has deterred previous members or even new members from using the forum is frankly just ridiculous! :oops:


Carthorse may not like a sack of potatos rider like me but on Horse and Hound forum we are in good company, and much loved by the horses we ride.
:rolleyes:

....ermmm and what exactly brings you to that conclusion Skib?? Truly about face opinions of the other place - today you are singing high praise about H&H just a couple of months back when i got Miller you were decrying H&H as elitist competitive riders that did not include you etc. etc. but of which you apparently thought I was one!

Seriously you really should not take threads and posts on ANY forum so personally - your habit of quickly turning an interesting debate into all about you and voicing very personal attacks on other members based on some strange notion that any opinion you do not agree with must be aimed directly at you! :oops:
 
  • Like
Reactions: carthorse

newforest

Somewhere in the solar system
Mar 15, 2008
27,453
12,809
113
Given that I've never seen you ride it seems slightly paranoid to think I'm talking about you Skib.

Forums are, in my opinion, for sharing opinions and discussions. If you feel the need to take things personally then maybe you should consider why. If I want to target a remark at someone I'll do so by name, if I don't use a name then it's a general comment, if you can't deal with that then it's your problem.
;)
Since the comment that's being referred to was a conversation you were discussing with me, I don't see a personal link to myself or anyone else for that matter, but a general observation.
 

carthorse

Super Moderator
Staff member
Jan 6, 2006
7,919
3,766
113
@newforest I'd missed that, and it really does make Skib quoting it and taking it as a personal slight rather silly at best. Thank goodness you didn't take offence!

@Cortrasna thanks for the support :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cortrasna
newrider.com