HOOF CRACKS

AL

New Member
Mar 29, 2000
2
0
0
Ontario,Canada
Visit site
HELP! MY HUSBAND HAS A QUARTERHORSE THAT HAS A CRACK IN HIS FRONT HOOF. WE STARTED FEEDING HIM BIOTIN LAST SUMMER, REGULAR TRIMMINGS, ETC. THE HOOF LOOKED LIKE IT WAS GROWING DOWN REALLY WELL, ONLY A INCH LEFT TILL THE CRACK WAS GONE. ORIGINALLY WAS UP TO HIS CORONET. THIS WEEK THE HOOF HAS CRACKED UP AGAIN. OUR FARRIER SAID THAT BEHIND THE CRACK FOR ABOUT 3 INCHES UP THE HOOF WALL IS HOLLOW FOR A DIAMETER OF 1/2 INCH. HAS ANYONE HEARD OF THIS OR HAVE ANY SUGGESTIONS. WE WERE GOING TO PUT SHOES ON HIM AGAIN BUT IF WE DO WE WILL BE COVERING UP THE AREA THAT GAINS ACCESS TO THIS HOLLOW AREA AND WILL NOT BE ABLE TO TREAT HIM. WE WERE THINKING OFF TRYING A BOOT TO TRY AND KEEP THE HOOF CLEAN. AT A LOSS!!!!! ALI
 

lesley cox

New Member
Mar 26, 2000
15
0
0
Leicestershire
Visit site
Al, my horse from being a foal had these, what we call sand cracks in both his front hooves and had never been a problem, up until last summer that was (he is now rising eleven). Last summer (june) the crack began to widen and an infection developed behind the crack which lead to an abscess developing, and another and another which finally following the usual treatment of poulticing, tubbing and antibiotics, did not clear up. Finally by September my vet decided that enough was enough and that he needed to be x-rayed. The damage inside his hoof was extensive and very painful. The farrier was in attendance and he ended up having to cut away about 1/4 off his front hoof to find healthy tissue. He then fitted an egg-bar shoe for support as laminitis had also crept in. From September to December Tim had to be kept out of the mud (quite a difficult task in our climate) which meant that he had to be kept in his loose box for 24 hours a day apart from the 1 hours exersise that I managed to to fit in, inbetween mucking out and going to work.

He also had to be shod regularly every 4 weeks and still is. It is vital that the hoof and the crack is supported and kept well trimmed to prevent the crack from travelling up the hoof. Tim is also on a multi-vitamin supplement. This is the only supplement that I personally have found to work. I have in the past tried biotin and farriers formula to help remedy the problem but to no avail.

You may be pleased to know that I am now riding Tim (although still not competing) and that he is allowed out daily to play with his friends.

Apologies for the length of my reply but I wouldn't want any horse or owner to suffer what we did.

regards

Lesley
 

AL

New Member
Mar 29, 2000
2
0
0
Ontario,Canada
Visit site
THANK YOU FOR REPLYING, THE INFORMATION IS VERY HELPFUL. WHEN YOU SAY THAT YOU HAVE TO KEEP HIM OUT OF THE MUD, WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE BOOTS THAT THEY SELL WOULD SOMETHING LIKE THAT BE OKAY TO PUT ON. WE KNEW IT WAS A SANDCRACK BUT THE INFECTION WAS PUZZLING, IS THIS HEREDITARY? I'M GOING TO PASS THIS INFORMATION ON TO MY FARRIER. ONCE AGAIN THANK YOU. ALSO IS YOUR HORSE'S HOOF OKAY NOW OR IS HE STILL PRONE TO CRACK'S. ANY OTHER IDEAS WOULD BE APPRECIATED. ALSO WHAT KIND OF MULTI VITAMIN? WE'VE BEEN USING FARRIER'S FORMULA BUT ARE IN THE PROCESS OF LOOKING FOR OTHER ALTERNATIVES. ALISA
 

lesley cox

New Member
Mar 26, 2000
15
0
0
Leicestershire
Visit site
Alisa,

I have used an equiboot on his bad foot, but found that the mud was still able to get in to the hole in his foot. So I tried using a pad of cotton wool in the hole (which was sprayed with an anti-bacterial lotion which I got from my vet) then I bound the foot with sticking plaster tape, and then put the boot on. When I brought him in from the field I hosed the foot out with clean running water, to ensure that all the mud was out, and in the early stages soaked the foot in warm salt water. I dried the foot and applyed the anti-bacterial spray. The foot was then left undressed all night so that the air could get to it. I had to buy an extra large boot because he had an egg bar shoe fitted so the boot wasn't used instead of a shoe but as well as.

Tim was fed on a feed called lo-cal (which because he wasn't doing any work then he didn't need and energy feed). Lo-cal is made by a feed company called Baileys. It has been developed to provide a horse with all the vitamins that they require on a daily basis with out having to feed huge amounts (Tim is 17.0hh and has approximately 1 1/2 pounds per day).

Yes I do think it is genetic and passed down (Tims sire Louella Weidekreis was put down due to laminitis) and as I mentioned Tim had these cracks in both front feet from being a very young foal.

I had a similar story 2 years ago with the other foot, but that didn't drag on as long.

The good news is though, both front feet (touch wood) are now completely free from cracks.

You might want to try this site it gives some useful information and sand cracks. This is where I think I got the information from for a multi-vitamin supplement www.equilife.co.uk or try www.hoofcare.com

Hope this is of some use,

regards

Lesley
 

jitterbug

New Member
Mar 7, 2000
21
0
0
Orpington
Visit site
Alisa,

I don't know if they have this in Canada but in England theres a cream called hoof moist, you use it like hoof oil but it has the oppersite effect and combined with feed adatives like biotin it can help with healthy new hoof growth.

Hope this is some help!

Anna-Lisa