I has splashed out!

Wally

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Apr 16, 2000
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Getting too old and wise to bother with skanky Shetland sheep, they are as skatty as the day is long, the lambs do not fetch good prices and you need a bloody good dog to keep them in order....in the past we have had 4 bloody good dogs in the end to make them work sense.

So I have treated myself to some rather fancy Flock book Texel ewe lambs. Much calmer, easy to round up with a bucket. OK 3 times the size of a Shetland, but you tend not to need to wrestle with them.
 

CharliesAngel

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Jan 15, 2010
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oooooh niiiiiccce!!!!! will you tup them to a texel or cross them? the money does seem to be in these beasts!!
 

Skib

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Dec 21, 2003
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You are a never ending source of education for me Wally. Never heard of a Texel - The herds here are deer. But cant look them up. Must go riding now.
 

horseandgoatmom

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Dec 3, 2014
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They are lovely !!
They showed a farmer on the news here - I think he was in England though that painted his sheep ORANGE:eek::eek:
I guess there was some sheep stealing around him so he painted his up to not be so appealing to steal .

They did look interesting for sure very HALLOWEEN:rolleyes:.

I do wonder how that would affect the value of the fleece down the road??
They did not say what he used to color them.
 

carthorse

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Jan 6, 2006
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Smart :)

Do you think they'll cope with the weather there, or are they going to need extra cossetting?
 

Wally

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They are a popular breed here,

http://texel.co.uk/node/70

The Texel sheep originates from the island of Texel, one of the north-western islands off Holland where the ancient native sheep was known as Pielsteert (Pin-tail, because of its thin short tail). In an attempt to improve prolificacy, growth rate and size several English breeds such as Lincoln, Leicester and Wensleydale were introduced at the end of the nineteenth century. Rigorous selection resulted in the development of a large, prolific and well muscled sheep. 1909 saw the formation of the first Texel breed society in North Holland which in 1911 issued the first description of type.

About 1933, the Texel was introduced to France and has since become established, particularly in the Northern provinces. In 1970, they were introduced to the United Kingdom with an importation organised by the Animal Breeding Research Organisation, who brought in four rams for experimental purposes. Another four followed in 1971 and ABRO initiated extensive trials to compare the Texel with other terminal sires. The verdict was that the Texel excelled in carcass quality and in particular, in lean meat yield.

In 1973, thirteen Lanarkshire sheep breeders joined forces with ABRO to import twenty-seven Texel females and thirteen rams from France. Further importations were made throughout the 1970s, with the first direct import from the Netherlands at the end of that decade.

In Great Britain, the Texels have shown that they are capable of withstanding the rigors of the Scottish winter without any hardship and their progeny have proved to be as adaptable in our climate and altitude as the Flocks in Holland and France.

The Breed is well known in Europe and in the continents of Australia, Africa and South America as a provider of a high quality carcass that has a high killing out percentage. It is also well known in many countries as a breed that transmits its qualities to its progeny when used for crossing purposes.

The hope is to put them back to a really nice Texel flock book ram and breed up some nice pure breds.

Folk do tend to put a coloured rinse through the Texels for the show ring.
 
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Wally

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Smart :)

Do you think they'll cope with the weather there, or are they going to need extra cossetting?
They will be lambing far earlier than the Shetland sheep do, I will be lambing indoors in Jan or Feb. Not May like the hill sheep and outdoor sheep do here.
 
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Jessey

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Dec 20, 2004
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They do look like good solid beasties, I love the look of a texel, leg on each corner type :D can you breed them later to get later lambs?
 

joellie

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Apr 24, 2011
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Wally I have a flock of 8 ewes and 4 of them are Texels they are very strong and heavy. Two of them are angels(one is more like a dog as she will follow me about and stand to get her ears rubbed lol) and the other 2 are very feisty when needing to trim feet and handle. They will come when I call them except for one but she is a real grouch lol Good luck with them, they look like a nice flock.
 

Wally

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These have come from a friend who specialises in pedigree Texels, they are already damn near tame! :D
 
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CharliesAngel

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the ugliest sheep ive ever seen are beltex, eeurgh, they look like squashed frogs lol lol

recently heard to get a 5th share in a texel tup was going to be tens of thousands :eek: !!!
 

Wally

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the ugliest sheep ive ever seen are beltex, eeurgh, they look like squashed frogs lol lol

recently heard to get a 5th share in a texel tup was going to be tens of thousands :eek: !!!
the mother of a couple of mine was that kind of money.

I'll see your Beltex in the ugly stakes and raise you a Cheviot ram, some look like Vogons!
 

Cremola Foam

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Jan 11, 2005
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Aww. Cuties. The farmer where I keep B and Peds breeds Shetland sheep and his daughter has Kerrie Hills sheep (think that's what they are called. White fleece and black and white faces. Cute things but wild as the hills!) we have a few kerrie's and a couple Shetland's in our field. Including Doris, the old girl who is very tame as was bottle fed as a lamb. She comes when you call her name! My friend who has the other half of the field bought her a coat for winter! (She's a very old girl. Farmer was going to send her for mutton but my friend said she would look after her and feed her etc so she is living out her days on the farm :) )
 
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Wally

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My friend who has the other half of the field bought her a coat for winter! (She's a very old girl. Farmer was going to send her for mutton but my friend said she would look after her and feed her etc so she is living out her days on the farm :) )
Shetland Sheep, like the ponies are tough as old boots and don't generally need any jackets of any kind.