Dismiss Notice

Hi, we hope you enjoy looking around New Rider. We are a very friendly board so don't feel afraid to ask your questions. Register now, say 'Hello' and join in the conversations.

Interested in other opinions

Discussion in 'Horse Care' started by Jessey, May 11, 2018.

  1. Jessey

    Jessey Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    18,922
    Likes Received:
    9,686
    Why do you think it is their responsibility to educate a client? This isn't me making it personal with you, I just genuinely don't understand why people expect that from someone they are paying just to trim/shoe a horse, so am interested :) If you paid a mechanic to change a wheel/tyre for you, would you expect them to teach you how to diagnose a tyre problem?
     
  2. newforest

    newforest She's not fat, she's too short :-)

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    25,392
    Likes Received:
    9,843
    It's a difficult grey area. But I wouldn't sue no, either for being told or not being told.
    Even the vet can only suggest and advise at the end of the day. Though they could as can anyone, report you for abuse.

    Who recalls the thread I started about a welfare person coming over to me and informing me who they were and telling me my horse was fat! They were not working at the time and yes thanks I know as does the vet and I'm dealing with it.
    I did take offense in that instance because they purposely poked their nose without taking the time and talking to me. They talked at me. Big difference Imo.
    I'm approachable so to take offense it must have been warranted. :)
     
  3. newforest

    newforest She's not fat, she's too short :-)

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    25,392
    Likes Received:
    9,843
    Where does that leave us on here though offering help and suggestions.
    Most of us will say get the vet, farrier, physio anyway.
    People have posted videos so we can look and try and guess the problem. We don't expect to be sued. I'm not a qualified vet but I can see a lame horse.
     
  4. Advert Guest Advertisement



    to hide this advert.
  5. Jessey

    Jessey Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    18,922
    Likes Received:
    9,686
    Legally, if you diagnose something, be it online or in person, you can be sued for damages. I think the chances of that for a non-professional are far less then when you are talking a professional being paid for their time/services as it could be misconstrued that the person had paid for their professional opinion and they had no right to give one (as not qualified to do so). It is a grey area for sure, one that I find quite interesting, I'm weird :D
     
    newforest likes this.
  6. Hoof_hearted

    Hoof_hearted Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2017
    Messages:
    113
    Likes Received:
    112
    I understand where you're coming from, it's not their job to educate people in what they do, if they wanted to do that they'd take an apprentice on.
    But I deffinately think it's their job to advise on the best course of action when treating things within their field of speciality, if the owner has a better understanding of whatever the problem is and how it comes about and how to prevent it then it will make their job easier in the long run.
    (Hope that makes sense I'm not great at putting my thoughts to words haha)

    If I was in to cars then I probably wouldn't expect it, though it would be nice to know, but then we're not dealing with animal welfare then.
     
  7. Trewsers

    Trewsers Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Messages:
    49,408
    Likes Received:
    9,691
    I remember that thread. I thought they were out of order approaching you like that. Bit like a person who came to potentially buy our old place. They informed me that madam was cresty:rolleyes:I didn't realise I was marketing her as well as the property!:rolleyes::mad:
     
  8. Jessey

    Jessey Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    18,922
    Likes Received:
    9,686
    I promise this isn't personal, I am just trying to understand :)
    Presuming you are referring to advising the owner on the best course of action, do you not think the two above statements contradict each other?

    However I completely agree that they should when in consultation with a vet

    You don't need to be into cars to have a problem with a tyre :p If that's not a good example, would you expect a nail tech to diagnose your nail infection/heavy metal poisoning? or just to paint you nails ;)
     
  9. Mary Poppins

    Mary Poppins Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2004
    Messages:
    11,587
    Likes Received:
    2,867
    I have learnt that the vet is the one and only person who can make a diagnosis. I got a Bowen therapist out to see my horse who had a bad back. She treated him and told me nothing more was needed and he was fine. One week later he went lame and the vet was horrified at the state of his back and 4 months later we are still trying to find out what is wrong. The fact is that I put my faith in (and paid my money) to the wrong person. Unless you are a qualified vet, no one can diagnose what is wrong with your horse.
     
    Jessey likes this.
  10. Hoof_hearted

    Hoof_hearted Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2017
    Messages:
    113
    Likes Received:
    112
    I've never had my nails done in my life but would it not be a bad idea to have them done If you have an infection.

    Yes they are contradicting haha
    I'm meaning that it's not their job to educate us in detail every little thing they're doing or showing us how to do their job, but advise us on what we can do to prevent certain problems that arise for that situation.
    We don't have to follow their advise that is purely up to our own discretion.

    I really don't know if I'm making sense anymore haha

    If you went to the doctors for something and they found an underlying issue completely different is it not their job to advise and inform us? If I went home then found out at a later date about this other issue I'd blame the doctor for not telling me.
     
  11. Jessey

    Jessey Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    18,922
    Likes Received:
    9,686
    The doctor is equivalent to a vet though (a vet is a doctor by title), not a farrier or saddler, who is more like a nail tech or masseuse :) neither of whom would diagnose a person, simply refer them to a doctor :) thank you for taking the time to discuss it with me, it's hopefully helped me understand why people expect non vets to give more input :)
     
  12. mystiquemalaika

    mystiquemalaika Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    4,088
    Likes Received:
    1,678
    I have a great relationship with vets, physio, saddler and farrier both personal and work and they all know me well enough to know I certainly wouldn't be pinning any blame on any of them. The farrier, saddler and physio (who is veterinary registered so not quite the same as some professionals is similar areas) are all happy to give advice and their thoughts and musings and we will discuss things happily with each other but then there is a long standing relationship between all and a level of trust.
    I don't however expect it out right and would hope I would notice something to bring up my own concerns but I also appreciate it if they have a thought or opinion on something I haven't noticed or am new to but again it falls to them knowing me well etc. If I got somebody new in then I wouldn't be in the least offended or place blame if they didn't say anything because sadly in the blame is a claim society and social media society we live in now it could well be well meaning advice given to someone they actually don't know from Adam ends up costing them their lively hood and/or reputation.
     
    Jessey likes this.
  13. Lemme

    Lemme Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Messages:
    4,495
    Likes Received:
    401
    Our farrier is brilliant, he does not hesitate to tell it as it is, this includes if he thinks too much weight going on risking foot health, it is in his interest to do so - but we would never attribute blame unless it was something he directly affected - we own the horses, we manage their welfare at the end of the day if something goes wrong that is unavoidable then we should have managed them better, for some things in life there is no blame to attribute, things happen and you have to deal with it, we are human after all , we make mistakes and all any of us can do is manage to our best abilities and learn from them. Advice is freely offered its up to us if we take it. I hate this blame culture society we live in.
     
  14. newforest

    newforest She's not fat, she's too short :-)

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2008
    Messages:
    25,392
    Likes Received:
    9,843
    There were some significant changes to the Barefoot trimmers a few years back. This was in relation to insurance. I had to use a registered farrier to be insured.
    I know people who changed their insurance I just changed to a farrier. I like my company and I like my farrier and in fact my previous EP was really hard to get hold of!

    I think what works best is if ALL the people work together and nobody sees themselves as an island in the care of the horse. The owner inclusive.
    I cannot care for her without the input of the people I pay to have the input from.
     
    Trewsers and Hoof_hearted like this.
The FREE site for selling smallholdings, farms and rural properties

Share This Page