jumping problem...

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lizzybeth

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Jan 17, 2001
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pants @ jumping...

:( Ohhh dear...I've been riding for around four and a bit years and am currently really enjoying my weekly riding lessons-anyway i'll cut to the chase... I've just noticed in the past few weeks when we've been doing some jumping (only about 2ft fences-maybe abit more) that when I go over the jump, as the horse is stretching its neck to land (well it feels like stretching) I tend to lean my hands on his neck to keep my balance. At first I thought it was maybe just the horse i wasn't used to or something- but its happened on afew different horses now and i have jumped most of them before. Ahhh- what can I do- or what am I doing wrong??? :mad: :( :confused: Help pleez!


For the record:
I am about 5.4ft, 9st, nearly 16 years old
The horses I've been riding are all around about or over 15hh -all sorts of breeds- cobxs, tbxs e.t.c .... all riding school horses.
 
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Maci

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Aug 3, 2000
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lizzybeth

If I understand your post correctly and I have my jumping "knowledge" in order here, your suppose to lean you hands on their necks for a short bit while you're in the middle of a jump. What you are doing is called a "release", and it is to help you keep your balance when you go up, so you don't impede your horses back. So as far as I'm thinking, you're doing it correctly! Has your instructor commented on this?

Anyone feel free to correct me! :D I'm not a 100% on this, but quite confident! ;)

Maci :)
 

kedwards

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Jun 11, 2000
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Yes, that's right Macy, that's the crest release, where beginner riders are taught to support their hands on the horse's crest while jumping. I don't know if it's taught in Europe, though. As I understand it, the crest release is used mainly to ensure that the horse's mouth isn't caught until the rider obtains consistent balance. The down side is that you're throwing away the reins and lose some control. I was taught that way, at first, and still do it when I feel like I might otherwise catch the horse's mouth.

Anway, Lizzybeth, I do agree that you should ask your instructor to take a look. Maybe you just inadvertantly acquired a bad habit or maybe you're jumping a bit ahead of the horse making it hard to get your weight back. If it's just a habit and your balance is okay, you could try jumping with your hands out to the sides (i.e., seperate your hands and hold the reins out so you don't have the neck under you for support). I've heard of exercises with no reins and hands behind your back, but I've never tried that myself.
 

lizzybeth

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thanx guyz!

:) Thanks you two- i thought no one would ever reply! lol! I'll my instructor next lesson if we do jumping! see u l8ers! luv liz xxx ;) :cool:
 
i did the same thing!!!

many coaches have different thoughts on this particular jumping problem!over the years i have had 4 coaches and all of them have had different opinions.
it is called a crest release what you are doing and it isnt wrong but as you get into more complicated courses it will be harder to use a crest release.when i had the problem of using crest release all of the time i learned to push my heels down as far as they would go and kept my head up.eventually instead off holding onto the crest you will be able to stretch your arms forward with your horses neck.also your coach might have some good exercises for you to use to help out with your jumping position(i know mine did).
lots of luck with your jumping!!

~Holly~
 

Mazpup

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Um well, I'm confused. When you say lean yor hands on his neck do you mean lightly rest them or put quite a bit of pressure on? I probably rest my hands slightly on landing but not loads.

This just got me thinking about getting left behind. Has anyone ben taught to let the reins slip through their fingers when they get left behind, cos it avoids pulling them in the mouth, but then, it means you partly lose control??? wat do you think?
 

Amy L

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If you do get left behind (it happens to everyone sometimes!!) then you definately should slip the reins but on landing you must 'knit' them again so that you have control again and the horse can feel that you're still there helping them. You must also try and stay in balance with the horse as much as possible and try not to pull on your horses mouth if it does go wrong because then you run the risk that they might get sour and associate jumping with pain.

With resting hands on your horses neck - this is a good way to teach crest release but make sure you don't lean heavily and do exercises on a SAFE horse like jumping with your hands behind your back etc to encourage your hands to work independantly. I would rather see someone leaning their hands on a horses neck then pulling back and jabbing the horse in the mouth.

It's all a learning experience and everyone has to start somewhere so don't worry

:) xxx
 

rockstar7

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if you get left behind and you're using a crest release, it's pretty much the right thing to do to let the reins slip through your hands. once you land, take the reins right back in a quick but firm motion, so contact is only lost over the jump.

if you're using an automatic release (meaning you have enough balance to lightly follow the horse's mouth throughout the jump, with no need to lean on his crest anymore), throw your hands forward and give the reins as much as you can.

if you get left behind, control your seat so you don't thump down upon landing. weight should stay in the heels. do whatever it takes to keep from hitting the horse in the mouth, which *hurts* for the horse, and leads to refusals and run-outs (since they get scared of jumping).
 
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