Sid's diary

Glad someone else said that. You would get hammered for the horse not being on your aids, on the submission mark and on your rider marks. Part of the rider marks is effectiveness of the aids.
Misunderstanding of anticipation. I did not mean the horse transitioning early. But the horse knowing what is to come.
 
I will stick by my reply. The horse should be listening to you and not "knowing what is to come" especially in a dressage test.
 
Another 10 min schooling session this morning as I had no time for anything more. He was very good but he is a terrible anticipator. If I ask for canter at one bottom corner, he will offer canter at every bottom corner. How on earth do I keep him guessing?
Just my two cents & feel free to ignore Jane but for me, it slightly depends on the context and stage of training as to how I'd correct it.

If the horse had been a bit lazy, behind my aids and I'd been working on improving their sharpness, I'd let it slide for a little while and just go with it when they offer the canter. I think it can be quite disheartening and counter productive for a sticky horse to be asked to go forwards but too quickly told 'Yeah, go forwards but just not like that'. For me, it's more important a backwards thinking horse wants to go forwards than when that happens, initially. You can build on being particular later but only if you don't kill their desire to try first.

Equally, I would ignore it initially in a horse that had been submissive and I don't mean submissive in a positive way (as in submissive to the aids) but more in a shut down and not allowed or had the confidence to bring their character through. I'd see it as quite a positive thing they offering their opinion on something. For me, it's a real step in the right direction of building a partnership built on trust and fun.

Again, later down the line (maybe the next session, maybe a week or a month) depending upon the horse, I'd begin to be more particular and change things up.

But, if I was riding a horse that either tended to believe 'Go Faster' is always the answer or I was riding a horse that had a naturally quite big personality and tested the rider's boundaries, I'd be much quicker to re-direct and mix it up. And I'd really mix it up. Sometimes I'd walk in a corner, sometimes a turn on the forehand, a change of direction, a 10 metre circle, a rein back, literally as much as I could think of. I'd try to be thinking a corner or two ahead of myself too, so I have a plan before we get there. In my mind, if I was riding that corner 10 times, I'd want to do anything but canter at least 7 times.

I feel Sid might sit in the first and last description slightly, based on what you've shared previously but I might be totally wrong! It's just what I'd play with. So I'd maybe allow it once or twice and then kinda keep a playful 'Nice try buddy but can you do this instead?' approach before re-asking for canter.

With P I have to allow him enough room to not feel wronged but also not so much room that he escalates and takes over, as he's not so subtly plotting word domination and I think he'd achieve it if allowed (no one is ready for that kind of revolution).
 
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Today it is going to be 30 degrees and was already 16 when I walked the dogs. So I let Sid off a hack, and instead we went out for a short - a very short - walk with Sonne and her owner, the first time Sonne has been out of the field since she arrived.

We went down to the brook, about 300m along the lane, and to meet the cow statue in a nearby drive who causes a lot of spooks among unfamiliar horses. We were passed by several cars, a van and two cyclists, passed some red fence panels which warn cars that they can fall in the brook, and met a couple of my neighbours with their bouncy Lab puppy, so quite eventful fora big baby 3 year old.

Sid was puzzled by the outing but was delightfully unflappable and sniffed both the fence panels and the cow to show Sonne that they weren't dangerous. She was sweet, very calm and interested (though the cow got pricked ears and high-alert snorts), leading well and relaxed enough to snack when given the chance.

A very enjoyable 20 minutes!
 
Another walk with Sonne today. We turned right instead of left out of the gate, walked up the lane, dodged up the little tiny path which emerges at the top of our access track, walked down to our house and let them both graze a bit.

Sonne was very good. The only time she quavered was when we passed a car waiting for us in a lay by and the driver's two smallish dogs burst into furious barking in the back of the car. The nice lady driver was mortified and apologetic, and Sonne flinched and wheeled around to face the car as it headed off down the lane. But she calmed down again quickly, such a good girl.

We have rosehips growing in our garden and I gave some to Sonne's owner to offer her. It took her 3 tries to accept one, and she chewed it and spat out the pieces so that was a Fail. Sid ate all of them that I would give him, he loves a rosehip.

Too hot for anything else. Much too hot. Oh for a thunderstorm!
 
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We've had thunderstorms but it hasn't really cooled anything down. Still melting. Mind, I don't think it's quite as hot here as you have it down there. Sonne sounds lovely, but Sid is doing a sterling job showing her the ropes and nannying her. I could do with borrowing you both to walk out with me and AJ.
 
A windy hack today. It was fun though. Sid was lively, and silly, so I was trying for that very low energy but authoritative riding which I find really hard. He responded well though.

In the jumping ring he jumped huge over the second one, from a long way back. I thought oo - er but just hung in there and he did it beautifully, though with a grunt of effort.

Back at the field I needed to open the gate into the wind from the saddle. I thought, "This is hard enough, you may not spook at the wind." He didn't spook at the wind!
 
I had a lesson today for the first time in almost a year.

I needed a fair bit of tuning up and must remember to keep my back filled out, not hollow (like the pole on a roundabout horse) and my hip joints open and flexible at the front. If I do this, and keep my elbows to myself so Sid doesn't just take more and more rein as he pleases, he will stop whizzing and go into a nice shape. I even managed to ease him into shape from walk into rising trot and on going large, something I've never really succeeded with before.

He is the best sort of schoolmaster. He can do it, and if you ask him just right he will do it cheerfully and to the best of his ability. Otherwise he has all sorts of cob evasions in his repertoire. So he teaches me to ride better.

Sarah my RI adores Sid and kept saying "He is so cute," and "I knew he was the right horse for you! I only needed one sit on him to know!" She admired my new saddle, said that it looked great on Sid and that it suited me very well indeed, and that Sid himself looked great, well, fit (if well padded) and happy.
 
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I went over to the field this morning intending to do a schooling session with Sid. But he was enjoying the bit of grass they got last night, and was so cute and cuddly when I led him down for his breakfast (with just my hand under his chin) that I settled for a pamper session instead. I groomed him (loose) while he ate his breakfast, then afterwards he got a massage (still loose) with the equine massage tool. He loves it and turns slowly around to present all areas for attention.

His grown-out clip is like thick velvet, so plush and soft. I like to rub my cheek on it. He doesn't seem to mind.
 
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Lovely hack today. Before it Sid was in the shelter having breakfast and a haynet and he started rubbing his face on the gate. I went to stop him (he rubs himself bald around his eyes sometimes) and he said his ears were itching. So I spent 10 minutes scratching his ears - around the bases, all over the pinnae, and most particularly inside the ears. He made delighted faces. I'm so glad he got over that horrible ear infection that made them both so sore and that he trusts me again with them now.

They are super furry, especially inside.
 
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I went over to the field this morning intending to do a schooling session with Sid. But he was enjoying the bit of grass they got last night, and was so cute and cuddly when I led him down for his breakfast (with just my hand under his chin) that I settled for a pamper session instead. I groomed him (loose) while he ate his breakfast, then afterwards he got a massage (still loose) with the equine massage tool. He loves it and turns slowly around to present all areas for attention.

His grown-out clip is like thick velvet, so plush and soft. I like to rub my cheek on it. He doesn't seem to mind.
There must be something in the air - Hogan is so chilled just now and enjoying our quiet moments of a bit of a hug and weirdo owner sticking her face in his coat.
 
I was hoping to ride Sid today before he saw the dentist, but it was showering very heavily and I just didn't fancy it. We had a new dentist, Sonne's owner's contact, and she was excellent. Sid really doesn't enjoy the dentist but he was very good.

Afterwards as a reward I was busy moving the fence to give them some extra grass. My back was to Sid. He lost patience, came up behind me, tested the fence with his whiskers - C saw him - and bulled straight through it. The toe rag! He is awful. Of course it works for him, he breaks through and there it is, grass!

C and I sighed, cleared up the mess (4 broken poles) and shook our heads over the impossibility of doing anything about a bad cob.

Memo to self: put Sid in the shelter next time I am moving a fence.
 
I was hoping to ride Sid today before he saw the dentist, but it was showering very heavily and I just didn't fancy it. We had a new dentist, Sonne's owner's contact, and she was excellent. Sid really doesn't enjoy the dentist but he was very good.

Afterwards as a reward I was busy moving the fence to give them some extra grass. My back was to Sid. He lost patience, came up behind me, tested the fence with his whiskers - C saw him - and bulled straight through it. The toe rag! He is awful. Of course it works for him, he breaks through and there it is, grass!

C and I sighed, cleared up the mess (4 broken poles) and shook our heads over the impossibility of doing anything about a bad cob.

Memo to self: put Sid in the shelter next time I am moving a fence.
oh the joy of cobs
 
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I was hoping to ride Sid today before he saw the dentist, but it was showering very heavily and I just didn't fancy it. We had a new dentist, Sonne's owner's contact, and she was excellent. Sid really doesn't enjoy the dentist but he was very good.

Afterwards as a reward I was busy moving the fence to give them some extra grass. My back was to Sid. He lost patience, came up behind me, tested the fence with his whiskers - C saw him - and bulled straight through it. The toe rag! He is awful. Of course it works for him, he breaks through and there it is, grass!

C and I sighed, cleared up the mess (4 broken poles) and shook our heads over the impossibility of doing anything about a bad cob.

Memo to self: put Sid in the shelter next time I am moving a fence.
Yup - Ramsey did the same - over and over. He felt the zap was worth it for the reward - in those moments, he was a hero to his field mates.
 
I got home from work shattered and worried that I had left Sid in a no fill turnout and it was suddenly warm and sunny. Hurried over to the field to minister to him.

FOUND HIM IN THE LONG GRASS AGAIN with Sonne looking meek and disappointed on the outside. He had done his usual trick, stepped on the lower line and ducked under the upper.

He is very sweet when I go to get him - comes up to me with a Hello whuffle and perky ears. I say, "Sid, why are you SO BAD?" and he says, "It's so nice in here, mum."

He wasn't too hot. As if I care.
 
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