Starting young horses....

iluvhorses28

New Member
Jul 29, 2005
821
0
0
California
Curious what "most" trainers or Horse Starters actually do within the training period. I generally know how they start a horse under saddle...but curious what actual trainers work on... saddle, basic commands on walk,trot, canter...not sure what to expect... or what to ask ...

Looking to talk to some local trainers should I ever get a younger horse to get trained... would be helpful to get some insight from anyone that can help here at NR.....

anyone???
 

Spriggy_Bex

New Member
Feb 3, 2006
144
0
0
hi

sorry i can't reli help, have you tried asking RI's @ your local riding school? they might no some1
 
I couldn't tell you what *most* trainers do, but I can tell you that most do more damage than good. Before buying a young horse, look into finding a trainer less than three hours from your home. If you find one you think you like, ask for the names of owners whose horses this trainer has broken- see if you can set up an appointment to talk with at least two of said owners, possibly even ride their horses.

I can tell you what we do. We first train horses in a roundpen in the indoor arena (but no, we don't "round-pen" our horses. We just like riding in them), and after the horse is confident and well-trained to the aids to stop, stand, go, walk, trot and canter (well, we train gaited horses, so we don't trot or canter- but I'll just adjust to suit the average horse and rider), back up, turn, etc... often a horse will have at least one little (or huge) problem during their training- whether it's a "go-forward problem", they're balky, spooky, a bolter, a bucker, a rearer, a nervous wreck, etc... we work through these issues in the round pen before we expect the colt to handle the issue out in the open. We also try to ensure that our horses don't drag their feet, move squarely and balanced, and with impulsion. Lightness is also a big factor- no one likes a horse that's hard mouthed and difficult to control.

We put a huge emphasis on being certain that a horse is relaxed and fully comfortable before moving on.

Once the horse is good in the round pen, we move on to the whole indoor arena, and after they're good in there, we have a riding track that borders our property, which is a controlled environment to practice riding outside in a trail atmosphere. I prefer it to an outdoor arena simply because the scenery changes, and the horse is always encountering new things. In an arena, they see the same things and learn to ignore them, but when they're out on their own and things change, they don't know how to cope. This way, they ride past a lot of different animals and vehicles and sceneries.

After spending time with the owner, we figure out what exactly this horse is likely to encounter in their new life, and prepare them for it. This means that if the owner plans on a lot of trail riding, we prepare them for trail work- we introduce them to a lot of different things they're likely to meet on the trail, and also make certain that they don't become buddy sour or barn sour, or bolty.

The main idea is to give the horse the tools to be ridden well and to behave nicely, to prepare them for whatever work is ahead of them, and to give them enough experience as to make a good match with whomever their rider will be.
 

iluvhorses28

New Member
Jul 29, 2005
821
0
0
California
de_Stille_een said:
The main idea is to give the horse the tools to be ridden well and to behave nicely, to prepare them for whatever work is ahead of them, and to give them enough experience as to make a good match with whomever their rider will be.


Thanks!
That is great insight into training! Also, do you also work with horse and rider towards the end of the training?
at a possible barn that I am intending to board our would- be horse, they have a trainer on site, which I think is great... I will definietely have to check that further....

OFF SUBJECT...sorry.

what is being "buddy sour" as you mentioned? That they won't go out without or with another horse on trail?
A horse i saw who was a younger horse neighed and whinny while her companion horse was being taken for a ride, and she was left in one of the pastures... I know this is not unusual for young horses who become "dependent" to an extent to other horses they are with...but is something like this correctible??

Thanks for all th info.... at least I have a gauge of what to generally expect training sessions to have... I can ask in further detail, I mean...
 

pengapenga

The Friesian
Sep 12, 2004
5,890
0
0
Australia
Visit site
I am currently training a young horse. I did not do the first backing as he had already been backed when I bought him.

However I work in a similar way to de_stille_een.

If you are looking for a trainer then definetly ask for references, I have heard many stories about horses coming back to owner with serious issues after being sent away for training:(
 

nutkin

New Member
Oct 5, 2003
2,805
0
0
48
kent England
http
I am currently backing a horse.I have used a similar method to de_stille_een. I started in the round pen loose schooling teaching the horse to walk,trot,canter,change direction and halt. Also moving over and backing up. I have just started long reining him and that is so far going well. We are still in the round pen at the moment but I am working him in a saddle and bridle and have leant over him although not in his saddle yet. The next stage is to get him working on the longreins in the school and then to take him out on the longreins to familiarise him with going out on his own to prepare him for hacking out. Once he is comfortable in all the above areas I will then get on and start to work on moving him forward from the leg. This is my first time backing a horse but I do have expert help overseeing what work I am doing and yesterday they congratulated me on what a good job I have done so far.I guess the key is to listen to your horse and not to move to quickly from one stage to the next and only move on once you are confident he is comfortable with what is being asked of him.
 

iluvhorses28

New Member
Jul 29, 2005
821
0
0
California
Great!
The barn I am planning to board had onsite trainers...which I suppose help so the horse is not sent away... I am assuming I should then ask what exactly they intend to do throughout the training and so on?...

I plan to also work with the horse... :rolleyes: If I can.
Many people stay clear of younger horses for this reason, many want a push button horse from the start...but I think it does not matter, provided you can acommodate a good start point for a young one... and start them well...
 

Wally

Well-Known Member
Apr 16, 2000
35,281
4,320
113
we have about err, about 17 youngsters in various stages of training. Their education starts from day one, we use the same commands in hand as we will ridden and driven, we make sure the horse realises that when we say do something, that they do it and NEVER get away with being cheeky.

We make sure they have, if not 24/7 turnout, then at least out all day and in at night in winter, in summer it is 24/7.

I make sure they get to see the older horses working in a relaxed manner, if they see other horses being ridden and worked with no stress it plays a big part to getting them working.

When the time comes for us to get on board they have seen it and arn't bothered by the sights and sounds.
 

iluvhorses28

New Member
Jul 29, 2005
821
0
0
California
Thanks Wally!

Although one time I've seen a young horse that while watching the older ones get worked on... was whinnying about calling out to join in.... maybe it was attached to the older horse in the arena, not sure...but it was a young filly eager to join all the fun :p

Later I asked the owners why that filly was doing that... it's because when they would train the older one on trails..they usually pony the filly with them... Does that behavior changeable in time or is that an age thing for the young ones??
 

Wally

Well-Known Member
Apr 16, 2000
35,281
4,320
113
babies will get upset sometimes if they get left behind, they do settle as they get older. Winnie and Randalín used to be really silly if you rode in the school and left them in the stalls watching, Randalín used to climb over the 4foot high barrier!

She is older and wiser and as calm as the others now, east her haynet and hardly takes any notice at all.
 

KarinUS

Well-Known Member
May 20, 2001
13,015
31
48
47
Texas
users.wireweb.net
Can I ask you straight out why you would want a young horse? It seems to be the least beneficial match for you. What do you hope to accomplish with this? What appeals to you about this option?
 

iluvhorses28

New Member
Jul 29, 2005
821
0
0
California
KarinUS said:
Can I ask you straight out why you would want a young horse? It seems to be the least beneficial match for you. What do you hope to accomplish with this? What appeals to you about this option?
This is generally just a thought.... it's nothing final, the experience of training a young horse would yes, mean ALOT of work...but my daughter would generally wish to be able to work and grow with one. That may sound silly to some, but it's something she has been doing at her RS, the girls have been working along side young horses and she enjoys seeing them develop and work along side them.
Granted, I am not going to have her jump on an untrained young horse, for obvious reasons, as I would get a trainer to work along side her.... she wants the experience...and you may say the "appeal " is that the horse started with US... not to say that is not possible with an older one....

That's not everyone's cup of tea...but we just have that as a thought....it's not as if it is in our immediate agenda. It's merely a WHAT IF... pros ...cons.... just talking, you know ?