Feeding Hay from a Natural Position with Less Waste

Do you use hay bags?


  • Total voters
    7
#1
We've all dealt with the struggle of feeding hay. Your horse spills it every where. Walks through it, uses it as a bathroom, and sleeps in it. Such a waste of time and money. So you think I will buy a hay bag. Problem solved right? Well it turns out that isn't always the easiest solution. Which hay bag should I buy. What size do I need? Where are there so many options? So you finally settle on one. Perhaps one with pretty colors or great reviews.

You're excited finally your hay isn't being wasted; or is it? A few weeks later your horse has torn holes in the bag. The opening is also small and the bag is frustrating to fill. Such a pain. You wanted quick and easy. Not tedious and wasteful. So you try other styles and watch more money go out with the trash.


Well we've been through the struggle. Paid countless dollars; and said a few choice words at the frustration previous hay bags have brought. We finally found a solution. An all natural approach to hay feeding. The Derby Originals Natural Grazer Slow Feed Hay Bag. (Patent Pending) So we're sure you're curious now. What's so great about this bag? Well here are your answers.


Slow fed hay bags and nets reduce the risk of ulcers, decrease the secretion of cortisol, helps minimize and alleviate boredom, increases chew time, increases digestion, reduces hay waste and assist in weight management.

  • Horses naturally eat with their heads down. This creates less strain on the skeletal system and soft tissue which is not provided with standard hanging bags and nets.
  • Natural Grazing enables the nasal passages to drain effectively
  • Horses emotional states are closely tied to their body position and posture. If a horse is required to eat with their head elevated it encourages an alert and tense mental state
  • Eating from the ground reduces the risk of hay and dust falling into your horse's eyes
  • Eating from the ground does not restrict the horse's peripheral vision. When the peripheral vision is impaired it can create tension psychologically. Horses are prey animals and depend on sight and sound to detect predators
  • All bags can be used on the ground or hung up if desired. Straps are removable so that there is no hardware when fed from the ground. Please remove straps when feeding from ground to prevent any injuries. Each bag includes 2 adjustable straps for hanging
  • Every bag has handles on the top and bottom for easier lifting
  • Holds approximately 3/4 of a bale
  • Comes with extra rope for lacing bag- Please see video for how to.
  • 1.75" x 1.75" slow feed openings
  • 228 openings and 202 cross stitches for extra support and durability
  • Mildew proof nylon
  • Bag is 18" x 19" x 26"
The best part is that this hay bag comes with a limited 1 year warranty. That's right Folks; if it breaks, depending on the situation, Derby Originals will replace the Hay bag! No more wasted money. The bag even comes in 3 different colors.


We have found filling it to be a breeze. It seems easiest to start with the bailing twine on the bale.

Simply stand the bale upright, slide the hay bag over it, tie the bag shut, cut the twine and pull them out, and ta da! Your bale is now safe from the destruction and waste of your horse. If your bale is too large no worries. Just follow the above steps but instead of tying the bag shut first just cut the twine and remove the extra flakes. Problem solved.


So where do you find this amazing bag? We've provided a handy little link for you

http://www.tackwholesale.com/product_info.php?products_id=4913
 

domane

Chatterbox
Jul 31, 2005
15,177
4,677
113
#2
But the illustration in your link shows the horse eating from the side. That isn't a natural action either and differs from how they would bite and pull grass out of the ground. What research and stats do you have regarding horses pulling sideways with their heads down?
 

newforest

She's not fat, she's too short :-)
Mar 15, 2008
25,298
8,734
113
A field
#4
My thoughts.

If horses naturally eat head down, why develop hay bags that hang up?
They are not slow feeders.The gaps are huge.
I don't actually get the horse is able to eat from all four sides, they have always been able to do that up until now haven't they.

The ground net back is only suitable for unshod horses. So you are are limiting your market.
 

domane

Chatterbox
Jul 31, 2005
15,177
4,677
113
#5
Ditto, Newforest. I've fed my barefoot horses in the past using "hayballs" - small-holed nets with the tie-up string replaced by a strong carabiner clip. The balls will roll and move about in the field which simulates natural movement with grazing. Your oblong models don't look very moveable. My nets are considerably cheaper too!
 

newforest

She's not fat, she's too short :-)
Mar 15, 2008
25,298
8,734
113
A field
#12
The poll asks if we use haybags and no we dont. We aren't the target market.
I think having an idea that works for you is fine its when you try and sell it as good to others that you can have issues.
I recall the fact you can now buy bags to putover the wheelbarrow, I just throw a rug over. Dam I missed that invention!.
 

joosie

horse slave
Oct 28, 2004
6,651
2,501
113
France
#14
I do use hay bags actually, but only in the lorry for shows, where there's only one way and place to tie them up, and the horses have to like it or lump it!
 

domane

Chatterbox
Jul 31, 2005
15,177
4,677
113
#15
PS I really like the idea of the small holed haynets tied up with a carabiner, that's clever
Here they are in "action", Jane.... very successful... particularly in the snow because they left little trails so it was easy to find where they had rolled :p



 

domane

Chatterbox
Jul 31, 2005
15,177
4,677
113
#17
That was William! He was a gorgeous Welsh D weanling that I bought. Unfortunately I had a nasty bout of depression descend not long after those photos and the decision was made to part with him. I still keep in touch with the family who bought him and I have watched him grow and blossom. He's rising five now.... Will dig out a pic when I'm on the poorer later
 

charl

New Member
Jun 23, 2016
20
6
3
30
#18
I have home made hay feeders for the field that my boyfriend made for me out of "gobbo" tubs from his work (building site). Few holes drilled in the bottom so the drain. Plastic mesh on the top that lowers on bungies as they eat the hay down. I've used them for the past two winters for feeding hay in the field and I love them. Best thing he's ever done ;)
 

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