Feeding hay in winter

Properties from Landhousefarm.com

Ale

Well-Known Member
Feb 8, 2012
8,737
7,512
113
Well I feed hay year round but summer it doesn't blow away!

My current set up is a tub trug with 3 bags of gravel in that I tie haynets to. Worked well but then the foxes destroyed the haynet.

Was thinking to maybe get a crate that would hopefully discourage the foxes from attacking the haynet and that I could tie the haynet to the bottom of, so it sat inside. The bags of gravel could go at the bottom too to stop it moving.

Do you think this would work or has anyone got a better suggestion? Also if it would where would I get a crate from? Would have to be quite large so Ale could obviously get his head in there safely
 

Ale

Well-Known Member
Feb 8, 2012
8,737
7,512
113
I actually really like the look of this but it is pricey. Not a problem if I know it works and is big enough, but I feel like ale might get annoyed with it and start kicking it!! 103096
 

chunky monkey

Well-Known Member
May 2, 2007
5,194
3,235
113
...la la land
You could get a crate from a builders yard and some pallets for infill. The builders yards have paving slabs delivered in crates. They would be big enough. Then with some pallets you take to bits you infill the sides if needed.

Equally if your skilled take some pallets to bits and make one up yourself. Ive made doors from pallets in the past. Or get some pallets and ask someone in your local fb area if they fancy a mini project for a few days.

There is someone that makes up those wooded crate boxes round here for sale and i think they either deliver or it goes by courier. So maybe have a look on your local fb horse riding page.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ale

Jessey

Well-Known Member
Dec 20, 2004
22,098
12,514
113
39
Suffolk, UK
I have pallet boxes (paving slabs are delivered in them) and they work pretty well and were free (thought lots of people have caught on now and are asking ££ for them). If there's no rules against it, by far the easiest thing with nets is to knock a post in, I do this and take them out and move them more often than I should :rolleyes: so they're not entirely permanent. The boxes are definitely more mobile though which is handy.
415A9311-4A16-4BC6-8210-68521BC269B4.jpegB3475EFC-5571-4BF2-80C7-3EF9B01909B2.jpeg
You could also look for a Dolav (big plastic shipping box)

A friend of mine has Hay Cube's and swears by them, they an all in one slow feeder and soaker if you need it, and are on wheels which is very handy https://www.haycube.co.uk/
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ale and Trewsers

GaryB

Well-Known Member
Mar 23, 2015
1,256
2,105
113
A fellow livery at my old yard had what looked like that eazigrazer in her stable. It worked well once her mare got used to it (a day or too) - it wasn't very big though, and for field use I think it would need anchoring (I *think* hers was fixed to the stable wall)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ale

Ale

Well-Known Member
Feb 8, 2012
8,737
7,512
113
103141Yes that could be an issue with what I shared above in that I can't actually restrain it and knowing Ale it would go walkabouts.

Bit of a result cycling to work this morning saw a couple of those pallet boxes dumped in a hedge so I'll go back later with my car and pick up if they are still there. Failing that we have this at work which might be better as means I can lay the slabs just in front of where he would eat from, the other one I would have to do all the way around. Do you think this could work. Are there any safety issues with using something like this?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Trewsers and Jessey

chunky monkey

Well-Known Member
May 2, 2007
5,194
3,235
113
...la la land
The biggest issues would be the nails. It could be an optical illusion as to how tall it is, but id be tempted to go only four strips high all the way round. The three might be too low and might result in a foot over the top. The 5 might be too hi and could result in leaning on the edge and breaking it to reach into the bottom.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Trewsers and Ale

Ale

Well-Known Member
Feb 8, 2012
8,737
7,512
113
The biggest issues would be the nails. It could be an optical illusion as to how tall it is, but id be tempted to go only four strips high all the way round. The three might be too low and might result in a foot over the top. The 5 might be too hi and could result in leaning on the edge and breaking it to reach into the bottom.
I plan on putting some bags of gravel in the base to help weigh it down more.

I don't think he would step over the shorter side, he would have no where to put his head as it's quite narrow so if he stepped in he would have to have his head up really high. You are right though there is a chance he could try and eat over the wrong side. Height wise you might be right, feel like he might try and scratch his bum on it. It's really sturdy but also pretty heavy. I'll have to measure up and see if I can even fit in my car anyway
 

Ale

Well-Known Member
Feb 8, 2012
8,737
7,512
113
It's 59cm deep, 80high and 55 high at the front and 100cm wide. Might give it a go and see how we get on
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jessey
newrider.com