Has anyone had this injury??

tikkitti

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Mar 8, 2015
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Hi everyone,

So I had made the decision to take a horse back we had out on loan as there had been a few serious near misses and the horse was simply taking the mick. The adult lad had been taken off with a few times. Upon making my decision I left him with the loaner for a month but said he was only allowed to be ridden in the school, this was to give them time to find something more suitable.

Some of you may remember I bought this horse sold as seen as a project from the field about 5 years ago however when I loaned him apart from the odd buck in excitement he was fantastic! I made the decision to loan him just prior to my bowel resection so May 2018. However now hes back as I found out on Monday he is worse on the ground than when I bought him, I havent been on him yet as I was planning on riding Mon but this happened prior. On Mon morning he decided to take off whilst I was leading him and opening a gate, if Id known how bad he was Id of led him in a chifney, I kept hold as long as I could, he then turned a corner I flew in the air and landed on my left shoulder.

I have managed to break the head of my humerus and also fracture down the bone So my left arm is in a lot of pain and unusable, as for my right it aches so much from the initial yank I cant lift a 4 pint of milk! They cant plaster it cause its too high. Picture of the culprit!! Hes 15.2/3 and a 9.5" bone, hes a unit, and he clearly won this disagreement. Been sent to a friend who breaks etc on Thurs for 4 weeks as dont want my daughter handling whilst he clearly has got no manners.

Screenshot_20200205-054744.png Just wondered if anyone has had the same injury and how long recovery took? xx
 
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Huggy

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Nov 11, 2018
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Gosh, no, I haven't, but youch! I feel for you, just the description makes me wince. I would think its the old story of really strict rest, which is always hard with arms - we need them for everything! As for the perpetrator - he's a bit handsome, and hopefully his 'rehab' will end with him coming home with behaviour to match his looks! Meanwhile, healing vibes to you. Have to add - a bit irresponsible of the loan people to let him get this unruly and not give him back sooner. I had a loan before I bought my first, and realised a) she was not a very nice horse, and b) I couldn't handle her. I sent her back within 3 months.
 
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tikkitti

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Gosh, no, I haven't, but youch! I feel for you, just the description makes me wince. I would think its the old story of really strict rest, which is always hard with arms - we need them for everything! As for the perpetrator - he's a bit handsome, and hopefully his 'rehab' will end with him coming home with behaviour to match his looks! Meanwhile, healing vibes to you. Have to add - a bit irresponsible of the loan people to let him get this unruly and not give him back sooner. I had a loan before I bought my first, and realised a) she was not a very nice horse, and b) I couldn't handle her. I sent her back within 3 months.
He used to be really good, I presume this isnt the first time but rather than hang on theyve allowed him to run to the field as theres no where else to go. This has Id guess been learnt behaviour. A bit of a nightmare but something Im going to have to hand over to someone else as I presume it will be months before I can hold him. x
 
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Jessey

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Ouch, that is a terrible injury and from what I know a very long healing one because they can't fully immobilize it :( Have they considered surgery to pin it?
It does sound like he's been able to run a muck with the loaner and has learnt some bad habits, have you got someone who can work with him while you are out of action?
 

tikkitti

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Ouch, that is a terrible injury and from what I know a very long healing one because they can't fully immobilize it :( Have they considered surgery to pin it?
It does sound like he's been able to run a muck with the loaner and has learnt some bad habits, have you got someone who can work with him while you are out of action?
I sat in xray and text a friend who has a stud farm, she used to do breaking and schooling and asked if she would take him, was completely honest so she knows what to expect, I feel honesty is the best policy in this situation. I feel its worth spending some money getting him right as I now csnt even muck out! Its going to be a while before I can do bargy horses Id expect. Shes collecting him on Thurs and Im really grateful for her help, at the moment hes clearly a liability. x
 

Jessey

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I sat in xray and text a friend who has a stud farm, she used to do breaking and schooling and asked if she would take him, was completely honest so she knows what to expect, I feel honesty is the best policy in this situation. I feel its worth spending some money getting him right as I now csnt even muck out! Its going to be a while before I can do bargy horses Id expect. Shes collecting him on Thurs and Im really grateful for her help, at the moment hes clearly a liability. x
That's great you have someone, and I agree the only way you can get it dealt with is by being honest about how bad he is up front.
 
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diplomaticandtactful

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Apr 25, 2003
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ouch ouch ouch. You might want to consider using a NH person as with a rope halter and teaching them to respect you, move their feet etc you can prevent the flight habit I.e. my large strong comtois would never be held if she wanted to go when afraid or being a pain, but she understands that if you move her hinds she comes to face you and she is under control. If you control the feet, not the head, you have the horse but they have to learn how to be soft. It works with Buddy much better than a bridle as it is teaching him NOT to use his strength against you. I show how in a big ring in a halter and he can trot around a big ring almost at the end of the rope and be relaxed. It takes time to teach but it really is good with strong opinionated horses or those that are very anxious. I can move 600kg of Suze with my little finger or a look as she gets it, if I took her on kg for kg she would win, but she understands that there is no need to fight. I feel your pain, Leo almost took my thumb off on a gate and I remember it vividly.....
 

tikkitti

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Mar 8, 2015
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ouch ouch ouch. You might want to consider using a NH person as with a rope halter and teaching them to respect you, move their feet etc you can prevent the flight habit I.e. my large strong comtois would never be held if she wanted to go when afraid or being a pain, but she understands that if you move her hinds she comes to face you and she is under control. If you control the feet, not the head, you have the horse but they have to learn how to be soft. It works with Buddy much better than a bridle as it is teaching him NOT to use his strength against you. I show how in a big ring in a halter and he can trot around a big ring almost at the end of the rope and be relaxed. It takes time to teach but it really is good with strong opinionated horses or those that are very anxious. I can move 600kg of Suze with my little finger or a look as she gets it, if I took her on kg for kg she would win, but she understands that there is no need to fight. I feel your pain, Leo almost took my thumb off on a gate and I remember it vividly.....
I can do NH and used that along with BHS methods when we first got him, now Im unable to do anything!! Hes going away and when he comes back I will be concentrating on groundwork until Im completely healed so will use NH then, to keep him thinking and busy. Thing is hes not afraid or in pain he has simply learnt he rules the roost and hes not far off 700kg!! He simply is doing what he chooses, just awful. x
 

diplomaticandtactful

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Apr 25, 2003
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I can do NH and used that along with BHS methods when we first got him, now Im unable to do anything!! Hes going away and when he comes back I will be concentrating on groundwork until Im completely healed so will use NH then, to keep him thinking and busy. Thing is hes not afraid or in pain he has simply learnt he rules the roost and hes not far off 700kg!! He simply is doing what he chooses, just awful. x
Sounds like Buddy, IF I forget to put the rope on the horsebox partition so I can pull it up behind him when he comes in, he notices, will try to set his neck and leg it.....he did it at a hunt ride and ran off saddle on, took his bridle off by hooking it on another horsebox and had a great time in the woods while I was in total panic. When he is arsey I put the rope halter on him for 5 minutes and do exercises with him, him muttering about cruel mothers, and then he regains respect and a degree of obedience....Hugs, horrible injury.
 
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Trewsers

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Ouch! Sending you massive healing and anti pain vibes. No advice, but I think you are doing the right thing - and glad to hear you have someone you know that knows what they are doing and can hopefully "re-program" him. (He's a nice looker btw too).
 
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Skib

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Dec 21, 2003
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You poor thing. No I have no experience. But s.i.l. had a bad fall from bike. Arm and legs and it took a lot of time and then physio to get right. Apart from anything else it comes as a shock. So you take care now.
 
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