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Hello, and need help.

Discussion in 'Older Riders' started by LyndaB, Jun 23, 2018.

  1. LyndaB

    LyndaB Member

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    Hello again from Australia.
    Have been doing quite well until recently. Still riding school horses, currently riding a 15hh gelding called Tommy, he is normally very good. About five weeks ago we were trotting around the arena, almost at end of the lesson, and next thing I know I see side of horse and realise I am falling. He had spooked suddenly and wide, he went one way and I went the other. Nothing broken, just some bruising.
    Got back on the horse a few days later, rode no problems apart from being a bit stiff and sore.

    Last couple of weeks have ridden smaller horse, found her difficult to get used to, and found my confidence even mounting and dismounting has taken a dive. Today getting on her, was on mounting block, I hesitated, and she pulled backwards pulling me of mounting block. Coach grabbed her and told me to let go, I was a bit shaken but ok, and so was Fanta - horse.
    I have a lesson every week, can only ride once per week as do not have my own horse. Have previously ridden with the school, ridden several different horses, had no difficulties till now.

    Next week I am back on Tommy, Question is how do I get my confidence back re mounting and dismounting, trying to do it correctly and quickly so I don't distress the horse.....
    Any words of wisdom that you can give me would be greatly appreciated. I know I can do this but my brain is telling different, I will see who I have for the next lesson - coach - and have another chat with them re same, they are happy to work as slow as I need to so I can get back to where I was at.
    I have also booked group lessons as well as some private lessons - so I can work on my goals.
    Many thanks. Lynda.
     
  2. Trewsers

    Trewsers Well-Known Member

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    Hello:D
    Could you ask your riding instructor for a good part of the lesson to be mounting in a slow and un-stressed way? Can you explain you are worried about getting on and making a hash of it, and that you need to take your time and feel comfortable with it since your fall? I would do this because if you feel any pressure at all about it, even a solid reliable school horse will pick up and it can become an issue for both of you. Same about dismounting, explain your worry. Even if it feels like a bit of a step backwards, better to address it now and gain your confidence back - I know know how fragile it can feel. Lots of vibes for a good lesson next time too.
     
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  3. LyndaB

    LyndaB Member

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    Hello @Trewsers thanks for your reply. Yes my coach said that she thought Fanta felt I was falling and tried to get out the way. It was a little scary, first time that has ever happened. My next lesson is on Tommy, and am going to get to stables early so to make sure I am ready for mounting up. My coach has given me some exercises to do to help with stretching, and I am also not going to try and over think this (I have a tendency to do this). I need to get my confidence back as in September I head to Ireland for a 8 day riding holiday, and then heading to UK to see family with my sister.
    Sometimes I wish I could ride more than once per week, but budget doesn't stretch that far.
    I know I can get there, am going to try to post a pic of Tommy if I can. Let you know how I go on Sunday. :)
     

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  5. carthorse

    carthorse Well-Known Member

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    If you find yourself thinking about it then replace it with memories of all the times you mounted without a problem, you've far more of those so it shouldn't be hard.

    I like your RI's idea of giving you some off horse exercises to help you stretch, and if you're planning on getting there early you'll have time to run through them before getting on. Although you're back on Tommie this week it might be worth asking your RI to stand at his head while you get on, just to reassure you.

    As long as you don't turn it into an issue you'll be fine :)
     
  6. LyndaB

    LyndaB Member

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    Hello and thanks @carthorse yes my RI will stay with me while I mount, they are good and very understanding. I am sure I will be back to where I was in no time. As Alison (RI today) said, "you have ridden five horses now at the school, we all have set backs, don't let this deter you". I will get there, have walked, trotted and cantered on Tommy and Buddy, so know I can do this. :)
    Thanks for your support.
     
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  7. newforest

    newforest Why have grain, when you can have yummy grain

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    Hi
    Being pulled off the mounting block I can relate to. Mine is usually pretty good but she had on occasion gone to set off and I haven't got on yet! But too keen there.
    You are describing something that everyone at some point has experienced- the horse simply unbalances you, they do sometimes go back.
    I don't make it into an issue. Line the horse back up and try again. Your point about doing it correctly made me feel as if that's pressure. Learning to do everything correct is great, but you can get self absorbed in the correct.

    Try not to focus on a blip. Our brains seemed to be programmed to tell us if something goes wrong once and fails to include the other 98 times it didn't.
    I will remind myself I wrote this. :)
     
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  8. carthorse

    carthorse Well-Known Member

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    @newforest that's a good point about getting absorbed in correct, and I should imagine that's even worse in a riding school. I suspect if I employed my normal mounting technique - throw leg over horse, with or without foot in stirrup depending on size, then sort stuff out as it moves off - in a riding school hands would be thrown up in horror & I'd quite possibly be asked to start again! My view is that the aim is to get on with minimum fuss & with an impatient horse putting them into a perfect position then getting everything right on the mounting block is taking too long. I do appreciate this wouldn't work for everyone though & I'm not holding it up as an ideal, but maybe it's an example of if it works it isn't wrong.
     
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  9. LyndaB

    LyndaB Member

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    Thank you @newforest and @carthorse yes I think one of the issues is being told to do it "correctly", I had been getting up by having one hand on back of saddle and then moving that hand to front once I was up and had leg over. I now understand why have been told not do this, I feel like I am not balanced or secure but I will get there. The mare moving backwards just put me of for a time, but trying not to let this be a focus for me. ( this mare has been known to move off, doesn't like girth being done up initially - have seen her pull back and break a string holding rope and sit on her haunches). Thankfully I am back on Tommy next week, and Buddy will be back in school soon - he is having a break. He is the grey one in my picture, so lovely, 19 yo, and he is so patient with everyone.
    Oh well, I can only say that these hiccups will make me stronger. Thanks. :)
     
  10. Trewsers

    Trewsers Well-Known Member

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    Tommy looks super:D
    Yes getting there early sounds like a good idea, then you can take your time and not feel pressured.
     
  11. LyndaB

    LyndaB Member

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    Hello everyone from Australia. Just an update, last couple of lessons have been on Tommy. Definitely feeling better on him, even my trainers have commented that I look better on him.. this weeks lesson I asked Bec (trainer) about doing small amount of lunge work. We did about 15 mins after she had us walking the arena then trotting, trying to sit back more, and was a little better this week. He is a little bouncy, found that he is 24 years old too - I didn't know that, thought he was younger.
    Lunge lesson was great, Bec had me trotting full circles, then we did some walking, balancing with arms out. Bec commented that I had good solid leg position and great seat, working on my confidence. Bec said she knows I can do this, and to stop doubting myself - its nice that they have confidence in me. Thank you for your support. :D
     
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