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Is Hay, soaked hay or haylage best?

Discussion in 'Metabolic' started by Jessey, Oct 3, 2018.

  1. Jessey

    Jessey Well-Known Member

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    This study had some really interesting charts even if you aren't into data, it just made it very visual on how feeding dry hay, soaked hay or haylage could have very different impacts, especially if you have a horse suffering with Insulin Dysregulation.

    A snip for those not wanting to read all of it; 2 top charts are for an ID pony, bottom ones for a normal pony, showing GI response on the left charts and Insulin on the right ones.
    Capture.PNG

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1090023318301011#tbl0010
    Given the sample size its not really conclusive yet, but there is some interesting info there and visually descriptive of how a ID horse's reactions to the same stimulus are much greater.
     
  2. Bodshi

    Bodshi Well-Known Member

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    I haven't had time to read the article (will save for later) but presumably you want the chart lines to stay as level as possible, so it looks as though soaked hay is a clear winner? Although interesting that the GI index goes up slightly again for soaked hay when for dry and haylage it's going down. Can't wait to read the article now.
     
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  3. Jessey

    Jessey Well-Known Member

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    The glucose level ideally should remain pretty stable (slow release foods do that best, called low GI in people food), as the body reacts to control glucose levels with insulin you can get a little up/down, its the spike that you want to be minimal. The bigger the spike, the harder crash after (why the black and green lines drop below the blue line). The more of a spike in glucose the more insulin the body kicks out to bring it back down and they (scientists) now think its insulin spikes that cause lami........
     
    #3 Jessey, Oct 3, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2018
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  5. Jane&Ziggy

    Jane&Ziggy Learning together!

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    My goodness! That is a strong argument in favour of soaked hay. But haylage, eek!
     
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  6. Jessey

    Jessey Well-Known Member

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    Eek for an ID horse, but the normal horse one doesn't show a massively higher reaction, given it was 2% higher NSC to start with
     
    #5 Jessey, Oct 3, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2018
  7. Mary Poppins

    Mary Poppins Well-Known Member

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    Well it gives me some satisfaction that soaking 5 hay nets per day for Ben is worthwhile at least!
     
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  8. carthorse

    carthorse Well-Known Member

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    I'd be interested to know what type of haylage & hay it was too, I bet that makes a heck of a difference. Interesting graphs though, and I'm sure the article will be an interesting read.
     
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  9. carthorse

    carthorse Well-Known Member

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    I wonder what, if any, impact the fact that they were fasted first made? Presumably the fasting would also have a greater impact on the ID ponies? I understand it's the only way to get the readings in response to what they've fed, but I wonder if that also colours the response.
     
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  10. Jessey

    Jessey Well-Known Member

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    I agree, the types of hay/haylage would definitely be of interest. I wouldn't think fasting would increase the response, but a 'normal' baseline from when they are at grass etc would be an interesting comparison point, there is definitely scope for a lot more testing in this area, I hope someone has the money to do it!
     
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